Against the odds

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Readie, May 21, 2011.

  1. Readie

    Readie Well-Known Member

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    #1 Readie, May 21, 2011
    Last edited: May 21, 2011
  2. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    When we talk about (not only) FAA, the crews must be taken into accounts, along with tactics strategy of usage.
    Swordfishes were rarely encountering the fighter CAP, or AAA (Bismarck as exception?), while operating mostly during the night.
     
  3. Florence

    Florence Member

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    The Swordfish was a beautiful aircraft. Like many others, outdated and outmatched. As tommo said you need to take into account other factors such as crew tactics. To my mind the courage of the men, the adaptability of the strategists tactictions and the ability to 'make do' were the reason the allies (namely England her Commonwealth) were able to stand fast begin to counter attack (as you stated 'against all odds'). Once the U.S. joined in it was game over - too big, too strong.
    Would love to see a flyby.

    Thanks for posting,
    David.
     
  4. Readie

    Readie Well-Known Member

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    On the money there David. The Swordfish is quintessentially English. There is one flying example left in the UK (maybe even the world) and that is at the Fleet Air Arm Museum in Yeovil.
    Worth a vist if you come here.
    Cheers
    John
     
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