Airbrush Help

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Catch22, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    I have a question about airbrushing (again). We keep getting random spurts of paint, so do I need a water trap for this? Also, despite being horribly thin, I can't get any form of flow at low pressure, or I get it but it slowly fades away.
     
  2. ThunderThud

    ThunderThud Member

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    1)First off what paints are you using?
    2)what air brush?
    3) what mix ratio?
    4)whats air source and psi your spraying at?
     
  3. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Good questions TT.These are basic for answering.
    In addition,the main problem with water spurts is that these aren't caused by paints but by temperature and pressure.It is a common feature of all compressors without the air tank.We have discussed this problem at Les' thread about his Fw190,as I remember.I've put there some pics of small filters that can be used for limiting of the effect.Another idea for avoiding the water is to use an additional small air tank mounted between the moisture trap and an airbrush.
     
  4. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    I get the random spurts, but its not paint thats spurting, but water.... Ive yet to remedy the situation, but are u sure its paint thats spitting???

    What do u consider to be low pressure???
     
  5. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Our regulator isn't accurate, but we're talking air barely coming out. It could be paint that's in the brush and the water spurts and sprays the paint.

    Airbrush: Paasche VL
    Paints: Tamiya Acrylic
    Mix Ratio: We were trying for 60/40 in favor of thinner, but we got more than that. (we were using saved paint that was at 50/50 then added 4ml of thinner)
    Air Source: Nailgun size compressor.
     
  6. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Do you know what air pressure gives this compressor?
     
  7. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Alot Im sure....
     
  8. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Rather no. Catch22 has stated the air was coming out barely.
     
  9. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    No, I mean what psi CAN the compressor put out....
     
  10. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Oh yeah, it can really pump it I'd believe. I don't know the pressue. We're working our way up from no air to full, so I'd say less than 10 psi, but it's not the pressure that's the issue, cause we can get all we need.
     
  11. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Now I've catched Les.THX:D

    The Paasche VL airbrush needs 20-60psi or 1.5-4 bar air pressure.So if the compressor gives less than 10psi it is no wonder the airbrush doesn't work properly.
     
  12. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    I can get more than 10, but I didn't know it needed that much. Do you know if it can do fine lines and stuff?
     
  13. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Do you have this kind of Paasche VL airbrush? If yes I've foun some info on this.

    This is the most popular and dependable airbrush used by T-shirt artist today. It features double action control and interchangeable multiple head assemblies. The VL can withstand continuous use and has earned the name "The Workhorse" of the industry. The VL has a self centering tip that is designed to allow fluids to flow freely. This airbrush is capable of fine lines and broad coverage. The VL-1 is best suited for light fluids such as inks, dyes, and water colors. The VL-3 is suited for thinned acrylics, enamels and lacquers. The VL-5 is for heavy fluids like enamels. The recommended air pressure is from 20-60 psi depending on tip size and type of fluid being sprayed. The VL requires 1 cubic foot of air per minute.
     

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  14. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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  15. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that is mine Wurger, and thank you! This should help!
     
  16. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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  17. bob3170

    bob3170 Member

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    Sounds to me like you need an accurate pressure regulator with a gauge, a miniature one, more than adequate for airbrush use, here in the US can be had for 30 dollars or so, plus whatever fittings are needed.

    Siphon feed Airbrushes like yours need the higher pressure to pull the paint up out of the cup or jar, you should, however, be able to paint reasonably fine lines with it. For the really fine hairlines you would need a gravity feed airbrush, with the paint cup on top, which as the name implies, the paint is fed by gravity, therefore requiring much less air pressure, as little as 5 psi for some.
     
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