Anyone willing to try this one?

Discussion in 'WWII Books' started by Velius, Jan 2, 2009.

  1. Velius

    Velius Member

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    Hey all,

    A while ago I found this article by Carl Bates in a book originally from Popular Mechanic's "The Boy Mechanic Vol 1" (printed 1913!). It describes how to make a home built man-carrying glider!

    Here's the link if your interest is piqued.

    How To Make A Glider

    8)
     
  2. Marshall_Stack

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    In the age of lawsuits, I wonder if they would publish that article now.
     
  3. beaupower32

    beaupower32 Well-Known Member

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    No, i think i will pass on this one. Might as well put a small engine on it and make a ultralight out of it.
     
  4. Velius

    Velius Member

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    Yup, they sure have. I found this article in a newer book while browsing around in a bookstore. I think it was a re-print of the same book.
     
  5. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    "The machine should not be used in winds blowing faster than 15 miles an hour. Glides are always made against the wind, and the balancing is done by moving the legs. The higher the starting point the farther one may fly. Great care should be exercised in making landings; otherwise the operator might suffer a sprained ankle or perhaps a broken limb."

    That's a disclaimer if I ever saw one!!!
     
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