Battlefield Digging Safety

Discussion in 'SitRep' started by Bill G., Feb 20, 2009.

  1. Bill G.

    Bill G. Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2009
    Messages:
    454
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Retired Guard
    Location:
    Plainwell, MI
    A very important safety message!!!!

    I have been watching a few You Tube Videos showing people digging up stuff from WWII battlefields. This can be a super way to find lost stuff and to get yourself KILLED!

    I saw one person handling a WWII anti-tank mine. Then he tossed it a side. He is lucky it didn't blow up!

    The explosives in bombs, mines, grenades, and even bullets becomes more UNSTABLE with age. Any handling can cause these items to explode. And ruin your your future!

    Handling these munitions is best ONLY left to experts. If you find any munitions, no matter how old or new, mark the area, note the location, GPS will work great, but use any means you have. Then notify the local police civilian or military. They will have the proper people go out and safely dispose of these explosives.

    There has to be tons and tons of very dangerous explosives still left on the battlefields of WWII. These explosive don't know the war is over. They are still waiting to do their duty and explode.

    Yes it is nice to have some nice souvenirs. But are any worth your life?

    Bill G.
     
  2. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    Messages:
    15,185
    Likes Received:
    2,027
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Public Safety Automotive Technician
    Location:
    Redding, California
    Home Page:
    Great advice, Bill!

    Could add to that, any munitions/ordinance from any era must be considered unstable and unsafe, including underwater sites.
     
  3. Bill G.

    Bill G. Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2009
    Messages:
    454
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Retired Guard
    Location:
    Plainwell, MI
    Thanks GrauGeist!

    And you are correct about the any era. I was attempting to stay in the WWII theme.

    I did find WWII munitions when I was stationed in West Germany at Pruem AS. I did report what I saw to the Station Security Police. He said that he would pass the word to notify the German EOD folks.

    Also during warm nights, I would heave the window open. I did hear a few booms in the late night. The speculation was that a deer had found a mine!

    No one "policed up" the battlefield after the war. Much was left.

    Bill G.
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,630
    Likes Received:
    1,415
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    You're quite right, Bill and Dave. Ordnance or munitions of any era, if discovered, should be marked, reported, and left well alone!
    A few years ago, I had reason to do some business with the Mines Advisory Group, a UK-based organisation that provides training and support to those groups that are tasked with locating, and removing/neutralising abondoned land-mines, often in un-marked minefields, some of which had been 'laid' by aerial delivery.
    I can't quite remember the exact figures I was given, but, around the world, there are/were, somewhere in the region of 13 million land-mines and similar devices, unaccounted for! That does not include other, air-dropped ordnance, and is only reflective of that ordnance 'sowed' over the last two or three decades!
    A month or two back, there was a thread on this forum about recent discoveries of yet more unexploded bombs being found in Germany, and the ongoing work required to render these growlingly frequent discoveries safe.
     
  5. BombTaxi

    BombTaxi Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Barnsley, S. Yorks, UK
    There are still several folks killed each year in Belgium by the left-overs from WWI, and thats just people (mainly farmers) going about their business. There was a British Army officer killed on Vimy Ridge about 6 or 7 years ago who was part of a volunteer team trying to make the site safe for tourists - 93 years after the battle, most of it is taped off and you take your life in your hands leaving the path :shock:
     
Loading...

Share This Page