Bristol Engines.......... used on the Beaufighter

Discussion in 'Engines' started by mikec1, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. mikec1

    mikec1 Banned

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    #1 mikec1, Aug 25, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2013
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    Greetings Guys Gals;


    This is a small collection of photograph of the Bristol engines
    that where used on the Beaufighter.

    This is one or my favorite WW-II twin engine aircraft.

    Hopefully these photos will be handy to the aircraft builders.



    Enjoy, [​IMG]


    A special Thanks ...... [​IMG].... to AJ Press .......... [​IMG]

    Mike
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    Attached Files:

  2. airforceone

    airforceone New Member

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    Thanks Mike..

    Really appreciate you sharing all these manuals..
     
  3. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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  4. mikec1

    mikec1 Banned

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    Greetings nuuumannn ;



    .... That is a nice set of pics that you referenced .......... :lol:

    But, My reference tells me that the Hercules engine was not the
    only engine that was used on the Beaufighter.

    ..... You may not be familiar, or knowledgeable of the other engines,
    but the photos where borrowed from a book on the Beaufighter.



    Have a good one,


    Mike
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  5. baders

    baders New Member

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    The only other type of engine installed in the Beaufighter was the Merlin. Oh, and one single example of a Wright Cyclone engined Beaufighter developed in Australia.
     
  6. baders

    baders New Member

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    The only other engine installed on the Beaufighter was the Merlin. Oh, and one single example of a Wright Cyclone engined Beau in Australia.
     
  7. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Care to share details about that, baders? I am aware of British one-off conversion when the Double Cyclone (14 cyl R-2600) was tested.
     
  8. AMCKen

    AMCKen Member

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  9. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    My favorite in the FMA family is the I.Ae.30. Nancu.

    [​IMG]

    To me it looks like an all-metal Mosquio / Hornet-like beast. Firmly embedded in WWII technology even though it first flew in 1948. Used a pair of Merlin 604s. 460 mph.

    Unfortunately, the entire population was one aircraft.
     
  10. Frankenerd

    Frankenerd New Member

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    780 KPH=484MPH! It was faster than the Hornet on 460 less HP!
    I wonder how they did that?
     
  11. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Where did you get 780kph?

    The aircraft was lighter than the Hornet, that has to be something to do with its performance.
     
  12. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    He got it from wiki:

    "During a cross country flight, from Córdoba to Buenos Aires, the Ñancú reached a level speed of 780 km/h, setting a new piston engined speed record in South America"

    Trouble is this gets back to was it helped or not by tailwinds ?????
    Speeds on cross country flights being good for press releases at times but not really good indicators of real flight performance, 400mph Hurricane anyone :)
     
  13. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Is that like the 500mph CA-15? As in the CA-15 went 500mph after a shallow dive.
     
  14. dogsbody

    dogsbody Member

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    Some Bristol Hercules pictures.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    OK, so it's time to ask something that's been bugging me on the Hercules. Airflow to the supercharger comes from the intake on the top of the cowl. I get that, but there also seems to be air ducted from the engine, down through the back of the wheel wells then collecting to an outlet on the rear bottom of the nacelle. Where's this air coming from? Is there a by-pass around the supercharger or is there some kind of waste gate? AFAIK, there's no such airflow downstream of the supercharger on a Merlin. Intake is regulated by a flap and all air goes to the engine.
     
  16. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a picture of the item?
     
  17. dogsbody

    dogsbody Member

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    This is the fuel dump line, not an air duct.


    Chris
     
  18. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Ah, I think you're right Chris, thanks!. One of the walkarounds I had bookmarked says as much, now that I look closer and I've verified this now looking at the manual for a Mk 21.

    Capture.JPG




    I guess what threw me was that the piping looks more like ducting in the below pic. Not what I would have expected for a fuel dump system.

    beaufighter_mk.xxi_59_of_93.jpg
     
  19. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    Fuel dump on Blenheim.

    [​IMG]
    Pipe under man sitting on wing.
    When you are trying to get rid of scores of gallons of fuel in seconds using gravity you need big pipes.
     
  20. dogsbody

    dogsbody Member

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    The Bristol Beaufort used the same system as the Blenheim.


    Chris
     
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