Can you identify this propeller blade please ?

Discussion in 'Aircraft Requests' started by SXS, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. SXS

    SXS New Member

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    Hi,

    This propeller blade (please see the the attached photographs) was recently donated by a local resident to our airfield museum - Boxted Airfield. As far as we know, it was recovered from the airfield or surrounding area, and has spent the last 70 or so years in someone's shed ! We hope to give it a fitting home in our museum, but we've been unable to identify which type of aircraft it came from.

    Boxted Airfield was used by various B-26 Marauder, P-51 Mustang, and P-47 Thunderbolt USAAF groups during 1943 and 1944, so we assume that this propeller blade came from one of these types of aircraft. But which ?

    The blade measures 70 inches from root to tip, is 13 inches wide at its widest part, and weighs around 115-120 pounds. The bearing measures approximately 8 inches from the root of the blade to the crown gear. The blade has been bent - presumably by an impact whilst attached to an aircraft. The blade also has a "cuff" onto which stencilled identification markings have been applied. Unfortunately, some of the identification lettering has damaged, but the following markings are visible:

    Dwg No C3_ _ _ _ 06

    Ser No A1_ _ 78 (the missing numbers could each be either 0, 3 or 9)

    Angle Low 16.0-AT-54IN.STA

    Angle high 46.0

    We would be very grateful if one of you knowledgeable gentlemen (or ladies ?) could help identify which type of aircraft this propeller came from, and any additional information relating to it.

    Thanks,

    Steve

    PS The item behind the propeller is part of a German V-2 rocket motor. The propeller will eventually be housed within the museum buildings.
     

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  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Looks like a Curtiss Electric blade, as used on the P-47, the type know as the symmetrical 'paddle' blade. Although the B-26 used a similar blade, its profile and tip were a slightly different shape. Allowing for the diameter of the hub, the dimensions work out more or less right.
    Hopefully, someone can confirm from the drawing and serial numbers - the other data shown are the pitch angles.
     
  3. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    It does look like a hollow steel, cuffed, Curtiss Electric blade.

    The blade root bearing stack (the gubbins on the end which fits into the hub) looks about right for a P-47, obviously without accurate measurements.

    The two pitch angles are different from those I've seen on blades installed on P-47s, but not by much.

    In other words I don't profess to know and I don't have numbers for Curtiss parts, but it could be from a P-47.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  4. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    I'd agree with a Curtiss Electric prop blade, although I also don't know Curtiss part numbers. The blade angles are not broad enough to be feathering, so precludes a twin or anything sizeable. Like the A 4 rocket combustion chamber behind it - that's quite an artefact.
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I've done a bit more digging, and it certainly seems to be the second type of Curtiss prop used on the P-47, from the P-47D-15 and D-25 on.
    The original prop was also a Curtis unit, but with a 'thinner' chord to the blades, and more 'pointed' at the tip. The other three props fitted were the one you appear to have, plus the Curtiss asymmetrical 'paddle' blade, and the Hamilton Standard 'paddle' blade.
     
  6. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Good stuff, Terry.

    SXS, how did you come by the A 4 combustion chamber?
     
  7. SXS

    SXS New Member

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    #7 SXS, Apr 23, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2014
    The A4 or V-2 combustion chamber was part of a larger package gifted to the UK by Germany during WW2 :lol: Seriously though, I believe it was recovered from the mud in Felixstowe Harbour (Suffolk, UK). It was acquired by our museum and has been conserved to prevent further decay. It's on display at our museum.

    My sincere thanks to all who have provided information about the propeller blade so far. I guess that the reduced ground clearance of the larger blade may have been the cause of the damage (bend) to this blade.
     
  8. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Glad to help. As there doesn't appear to be any damage or abrasion to the prop tip, it's very possible that the bend was caused by a collision from a ground vehicle, whilst the aircraft was stationary, and engine off. That said, the overall condition is so good, and with that large indentation near the root, the prop might have been dropped or damaged during fitting, removal or transit.
    I'll try to visit your museum next time I'm down that way, although that's rare these days. I do, however, intend to visit some of the museums and former airfields in the region, if not this summer, then maybe next year.
     
  9. MiTasol

    MiTasol Active Member

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    Those who guessed Curtiss and Marauder were right on
    To quote the interchangeability bible row 32 it fits B and C model B-26 aircraft
    Curtiss prop blade.jpg
     
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