Can you spray paint models??

Discussion in 'Modeling' started by r2800doublewasp, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. r2800doublewasp

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Not old enough to work yet
    Location:
    Northern California
    Hi all,
    I was just wondering if any of you guys have used those model master (or other) spray cans to get a nice even and smooth finish on models. Like a natural aluminum or black finish or something. Also, would it affect the model at all like the decal application or anything like that?
    Thanks
    r2800
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,719
    Likes Received:
    1,421
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    Aerosol cans of model paint can be used, but of course control is limited, and is also dependant on the physical size of the model. Bear in mind that the spray pattern from aerosols is fairly wide, and the pressure is relatively high. This means that spraying, generally, has to be done further from the surface, which, of course, means the pattern becomes even wider.
    On a largish model, say a 1/48th scale 'bomber' sized aircraft, a single colour could possibly be accomplished, given that the model was properly masked where required. The colour itself also has a bearing on the final result, with metallics, for instance, being a bit difficult to spray effectively for a good, scale appearance.
    However, many car modellers do use aerosols successfully for spraying an overall colour on the car body, and the physical shape of the model in this instance obviously helps.
    The only way to find out if this method is suitable for a particular application is to experiment on a 'scrap' model, but don't expect to be able to achieve great results with a multi-coloured scheme, especially some camouflage patterns for example.
    I did try aerosols many years ago, before I got my first airbrush, but gave up and went back to brush painting, which I still do at least some of the time, depending on the job.
     
  3. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Messages:
    12,162
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    The back of beyond
    I used to use them when I was still in Oz (can't get 'em here). Tamiya's are great and coat nice and thin, but usually need atleast two coats (atleast 3 for whites and reds), while Airfix sprays are thick, but 'one coaters'.
    (I miss the Tamiya aluminium sprays ALOT!)

    Great tips there Terry!
     
  4. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    7,731
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Student, Musician, Writer, Thinker, Shelf Stacker...
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria
    I use a few general purpose and auto sprays. I've been using a silver for an RAAF mossie and it works pretty well. I also recently bought some matt cote from Testors in can form. Havent used that yet, overall though I want to get an airbrush.
     
  5. 109ROAMING

    109ROAMING Active Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    5,999
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    New Zealand
    I sprayed the underside of my B-52 with some satin black ,just some random spray paint. Worked fine
     
  6. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Messages:
    12,162
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    The back of beyond
    Car sprays are okay, but again thicker coat. I sprayed an Airfix Red Arrows Hawk in 'Nissan red' I think. Even building up thin layers, allowing drying time in between, effectively produced a solid but thick coat which eliminated the panel line detail...

    ..That said, this can be an advantage if using car sprays as a primer on joins that require alot of filling and sanding. The slight unevenness or minute indentations can be effectively and smoothly eliminated under a coat of car spray.
     
  7. r2800doublewasp

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Not old enough to work yet
    Location:
    Northern California
    Thanks alot guys..but what about a 1/72 revell A-26B. (solid gun nose) Im planning on making it a post war version (B-26) which is going to be a solid black. Would it be better to brush paint or spray paint this aircraft?
     
  8. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,719
    Likes Received:
    1,421
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    I think I'd be tempted to brush-paint it, using matt, or semi-matt black. The final required finish, gloss, semi-gloss etc, can be achieved with the relevant clear coat.
     
  9. r2800doublewasp

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Not old enough to work yet
    Location:
    Northern California
    Ya that's what I decided on doing...thanks a lot for all your input!
     
Loading...

Share This Page