Cessna SkyCourier

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MIflyer

1st Lieutenant
6,437
12,611
May 30, 2011
Cape Canaveral
First Flight, 17 May 2020. They already have 50 orders from Fedex and another 50 options from other buyers.

So Cessna decides to build a Twin Otter?

cessna_skycourier_takeoff_1_copy.jpg
 
I have always admired STOL ac ... not surprising with DeHavilland Canada in the Toronto burbs :)... building the Lysander Airfix kit gave me this image of the ac floating .... down .... the Storch really caught my imagination ... the things engineers could to with shape and size, flaps and slots, the airfoil as sustainer of 'lift'.
Boundary Layer Control (BLC) ..... unknown in the birthing years of STOL .... now gives a new edge ... slower LSs and shorter TOs to height.
The superb ShinMaywa US2 Maritime Patrol amphibian uses Boundary Layer Controls and gains major performance in STOL .


Would what works with an AC this size and cost, benefit a bird the size of a Twin Otter? Added weight of compressors, for consideration ...
Could the BLC system be scaled for Twin Otter size AC and implemented cost effectively?
 
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Or the Harbin Y-12...View attachment 582096

I doubt that Cessna went with the Gonad's flaperon system...

Or some of its other "innovations" like that bl**dy handle that locked the doors on the N22 to stop you starting the engines, or putting all the essential circuit breakers next to the battery in the wheel pod so that a rough field takeoff could shake them so much they popped just before rotation leaving you with no attitude instruments, or the oddball square section o-rings in the oleos, etc. Real genius.
 
Or some of its other "innovations" like that bl**dy handle that locked the doors on the N22 to stop you starting the engines, or putting all the essential circuit breakers next to the battery in the wheel pod so that a rough field takeoff could shake them so much they popped just before rotation leaving you with no attitude instruments, or the oddball square section o-rings in the oleos, etc. Real genius.
Well, the 'G' in GAF does stand for 'Government'.
 
The C-27J's were not scrapped, or at least not right away, but just preserved and parked. I guess the requirement for them went away, whatever that was.

Similarly, the C-23A Sherpa requirement went away after the USSR collapsed and urgent priority short haul supply runs around Europe were no longer required. At least in their case the US Army picked up some of them and used them in Iraq for quite a few years.

I read where some new unused small transports sent to Afghanistan were scrapped because there was no need for them and they did not have enough range to fly to anywhere useful.
 
I understand that the manufacturer will not support them if they are resold, so as to not impinge on new orders. That may be the main reason these aircraft are doomed.
 

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