Crew Multiple Aircraft

Discussion in 'Aircrew equipment' started by Park, Aug 14, 2015.

  1. Park

    Park Member

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    Did pilots serve in different aircraft during the war?
     
  2. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    Do you mean they fly a different serial numbered aircraft throughout their tour, or if the flew various types of aircraft?

    Short answer for both...

    Yes for the first one, some for the 2nd one.
     
  3. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    The pilots that delivered the aircraft certainly did!
     
  4. VBF-13

    VBF-13 Well-Known Member

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    My Dad went from SBD to F6F to FM2. The Navy guys had their type of combat aircraft they trained and qualified on and when they went to a different type they had to train and qualify on that.
     
  5. jugggo

    jugggo Member

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    Also do not forget Charles Lindbergh did the same thing corsairs and P 38 lightnings
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    As examples for RAF (and Commonwealth) pilots (and aircrew where relevant), in Bomber Command, a pilot (and crew) might have started out on, for example, the Hampden in 1940 or 1941, then converted to the Lancaster, possibly also flying the Halifax, depending on which Squadron(s) he (or they) served on.
    In Fighter Command, a pilot might have started on a Hurricane Squadron, which then converted to the Spitfire, then Typhoon or Tempest, or may have eventually been posted to a twin-engined equipped unit, flying the Beaufighter and/or Mosquito.
    A lot would depend (in any Air Force) on the date he qualified, and where he was posted to, as well as how many Operational tours he'd fly. This is, of course, not including the progression of types during initial training, advanced training and conversion training.
     
  7. Bernhart

    Bernhart <b>2012 Forum Fantasy Football Champion</ b>

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    read about a Canadian pilot that started on sterlings then to lancasters and finally b-17
     
  8. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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  9. Park

    Park Member

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    My apologies, I was thinking in combat during the same time period. Example; one week flying a 17 and the next week a 24. Very unlikely, but I wonder if it happened.
     
  10. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    No, at least not operationally, because when a unit changed the type it operated it converted over a period of time when it and all its personnel were not operational.

    There are possibilities for this to be a relatively short period. For example, in the RAF it might be possible for a Lancaster pilot to be posted somewhere he would fly the Halifax or Sterling with which he may have been familiar, but even then he would have undergone some 'refreshment' before becoming operational.

    The difference between a qualified pilot and an operational pilot is something that even some reputable historians have failed to grasp :)

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  11. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    #11 pbehn, Aug 16, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2015
    During the BoB some pilots switched between Hurricanes and Spitfires or the other way around for various reasons mainly the desperation of the situation, not in the same squadron but when being switched from one squadron to another.
     
  12. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    I forgot the RAF did operate the B 17 for a while.
     
  13. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Yes they did, but they would still require and get some familiarisation between becoming operational. I can't think of an instance where this happened with a Class A squadron in 11 Group, but if it did the same would have applied unless, just possibly, the pilot in question was experienced on both types.
    Cheers
    Steve
     
  14. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    Agreed but at the height of the battle what is considered adequate for familiarisation may change. In any case were the spitfire and hurricane so different to fly?
     
  15. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Mike Crosley managed to 'blag' a Swordfish to fly south in December '42. He had started one up, but never flown one. He describes flying "at nought feet in 500 yards visibility and with the cliff tops disappearing into the cloud" as he followed the coast.

    He also describes his second flight in a Spitfire and the difficulties he experienced at first, particularly with the light elevator control. On trying to formate with a colleague he described the stick forces as so light (after the Hurricane) that "..I was continually over correcting. My Spitfire was prancing up and down beside him like a Mustang."
    Crosley at this time was a very experienced fighter pilot, just not on Spitfires.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
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