F/M Montgomery's Non-Fraternisation policy letters

For general interest:

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Gnomey said:
Interesting stuff James. Is there any record of those who did not obey the non-fraternisation rule. From what I have heard and read about none of the frontline soldiers paid it much attention.

Sorry, Gnomey, I don't know the answer to your question -- I wasn't serving there.

James
 

plan_D

Lieutenant Colonel
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Apr 1, 2004
Most British troops did follow the guidelines in most circumstances because the British had been bombed by Germany, had suffered the might of Germany on it's own civilians. There was always some modicum of respect on the battlefield between the British and German forces, but it wasn't directly translated to our occupation. But, remember, not all people think alike - the British troops were still human. Most, if not all, could not look a child in the eye and not say something, or give a homeless family food. And, of course, a soldier that had been in conflict for six long years - couldn't turn down a 'favour' for just some choclate...

But, none of it mattered because the occupation, on a whole, worked. Germans and Germany were always put in their place, there was no changing that.
 

DerAdlerIstGelandet

Private Chemtrail Disperser
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USA/Germany
Well I know that from my families experience and stories from my Grandmother, the allies that occupied her towns were very friendly and she remembered only good things. She remembers one soldier telling her that they did not want the civilians to think that they were evil or bad but rather trying to do something good for them and this is how a democratic country operates. To teach to live under a democratic system.
 

schwarzpanzer

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Aug 8, 2005
In the occupation the British occupiers obeyed German rules, the German people obeyed British rules. Mutual respect which Germans and Britons have usually shared.

Both are usually reluctant to brutalise each other or stab them in the back.

Britains were treat well in POW camps (of course not always) as were German POW's in Britain (one was apparently even taken to the local pub!).

The Germans were not considered as hated enemy (unlike the Japanese). Unless of course you were Jewish, racist, had lost family in the war or were bombed etc.
 

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