F8F Bearcat rate of climb

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by DCG2U, May 30, 2013.

  1. DCG2U

    DCG2U New Member

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    #1 DCG2U, May 30, 2013
    Last edited: May 31, 2013
    Greetings everyone,

    I searched everywhere around the web to find the Bearcat best rate of climb (any variant) because some say it had the fastest rate of climb of any piston fighter at 6300 ft/min (32 m/s) while others say it could only achieve around 4300 ft/min (23 m/s). Here are my sources:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grumman_F8F_Bearcat


    Quote

    An unmodified production F8F-1 set a 1946 time-to-climb record (after a run of 115 ft/35 m) of 10,000 ft (3,048 m) in 94 seconds (6,383 fpm). The Bearcat held this record for 10 years until it was broken by a modern jet fighter (which still could not match the Bearcat's short takeoff distance).





    http://www.aviastar.org/comments/comments.php?order=0&aircraft=0507

    Great discussion about people that actually flew a Bearcat.


    http://www.warbirdaeropress.com/articles/HotestCats/HotCats.htm

    http://www.warbirdsforum.com/topic/147-grumman-f8f-bearcat-climb-rate/

    http://www.angelfire.com/space/grumman/aircraft/bearcat.html

    http://www.aer.ita.br/~bmattos/mundo/country/usa/grumman_bearcat.html

    http://historywarsweapons.com/f8f-bearcat/

    http://www.aviation-history.com/grumman/f8f.html


    http://www.wwiiaircraftperformance.org/F8F/F8F-2_Standard_Aircraft_Characteristics.pdf


    This link is the real performance charts of the F8F Bearcat.



    I love this aircraft a lot but just want to know if legends about it are true.

    Thank you.
     
  2. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Something might be done with cropped links?
     
  3. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    I'll look at a pilot's manual this coming weekend and see what it says.
     
  4. DCG2U

    DCG2U New Member

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    Fixed the links, sorry I didn't notice.
     
  5. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    It happens to all of us once in awhile. Thanks for the fix.
     
  6. krieghund

    krieghund Member

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  7. Readie

    Readie Well-Known Member

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    The Bearcat I watched at West Malling in the early 1980's rate of climb can be summed up in one word...Phenomenal.
    Cheers
    John
     
  8. norab

    norab Well-Known Member

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    not something I can quantify, but long ago when the big annual EAA fly-in was still at Rockford, I saw a race between a bearcat and a P-51 from a standing start. The bearcat took off, retracted gear, circled the field, and was making a simulated firing run on the mustang before the P-51's wheels even left the ground. It was impressive as hell
     
  9. DCG2U

    DCG2U New Member

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    Judging by these performance sheets, there is no way that any F8F Bearcat could climb at 6300 ft/min. 4000 ft/min seems more accurate. Not that I am doubting your real life accounts guys but I need some data in order to prove it. From what I've read in the forums (and other sources), the record established by the Bearcat in 1946 was an unmodified F8F-1, 50% fuel, combat armor, guns but no ammo but according to krieghund performance charts, there's no way it could climb 6000 ft in 90 seconds.
     
  10. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    One of our member's father was the pilot who flew this aircraft, let's see if he chimes in on this one...
     
  11. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    Well, if you extend the graph on the F8F-1 it shows an inital climb rate of about 4,735 fpm. Profile Publications shows the same 2,400 hp. at 1,000 ft. and adds that war emergency between 9,500 - 16,600 ft. was 2,700 hp. Test weight being 9,334 lbs. would give it a power loading of 3.457 lbs./hp. The Bearcat was a relatively small plane to a lot of its contemporaries AND keep in mind the PW-2800 was an engine that could be pushed well past the military established limits and keep on ticking. Anybody that knows what I'm talking about jump in anytime and give me some help here.

    OK, I know this is off topic sort of, I have been researching the Ki.44-III. It was suppose to have 2,000 hp. Increased wing area (204 sq.ft.). Combat (interceptor) weight of 5,357 lbs. That's 2.6785 lbs./hp. I wonder how fast that bad boy climbed.? I also wonder how the increased wing area affected handling.?
     
  12. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    there's no way it could climb 6000 ft in 90 seconds.[/QUOTE] Correct that DCG2U. Go on now.
     
  13. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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  14. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    "theater", why are we having this discussion again? Nice FLYBOY. You the man Joe.
     
  15. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    #15 GregP, Jun 2, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
    Went to the Museum today and found the Erection and Maintenance Manual and the Parts Manual, but couldn't locate the Pilot's Manual, and Steve Hinmton left for another airshow before I could catch him. It's have to wait another week or so.
     
  16. DCG2U

    DCG2U New Member

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    Correct that DCG2U. Go on now.[/QUOTE]

    Just took a look at FLYBOYJ's link and I stand corrected. Sorry, didn't look through the whole thread when I tried to find info about its rate of climb. I don't want to be picky but is there's any book/information accessible to everyone? Not that I doubt him, I just want to see if there is more ''official'' information about its rate of climb.

    Thanks again.
     
  17. DCG2U

    DCG2U New Member

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    Just took a look at FLYBOYJ's link and I stand corrected. Sorry, didn't look through the whole thread when I tried to find info about its rate of climb. I don't want to be picky but is there's any book/information accessible to everyone? Not that I doubt him, I just want to see if there is more ''official'' information about its rate of climb.

    Thanks again.
     
  18. krieghund

    krieghund Member

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    #18 krieghund, Jun 2, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
    Here is the Take-off, climb and landing chart from the FM Sorry it is a bit blurry. Also remember that the climb is usually scheduled at Military Power and not WEP.
     

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  19. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    DCG2U,

    You posted it twice and still didn't get it: 6000 ft. in 90 seconds is 4,000 fpm avg. A time that even a fully loaded F8F could accomplish from sea level. I'm just messing with you man, I figured you meant 6,000 meters.


    krieghund,
    I forgot to tell you thanks for the charts/graphs and information.
     
  20. DCG2U

    DCG2U New Member

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    Oops, I meant 10 000 ft in 90 seconds, which is roughly 3000 meters. But yeah I get it, this could achieve such feats, I was just a little skeptical.
     
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