Feedback from shooting weaponry on the pilot

Discussion in 'Other aviation games/sims' started by Furst, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. Furst

    Furst New Member

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    Hello there,

    first of all, since this is my first post in these forums let me introduce myself. Im Furst, age 30, and im desperately looking for an answer and i hope that this forum offers this opportunity to me! ;)

    As already mentioned in the topic title, my question is about the force created by shooting the weaponry on ww2 aircraft and its effect on the pilot. My basic assumption is that by shooting the machine guns or cannons, the airframe receives a significant amount of shaking, which is then translated to the pilot.

    I dont assume that the pilots vision suffered from it, but i expect it to be a noticeable force.

    Is this assumption correct and if yes, how would you visualize this effect? If no, thanks for the help anyway!

    Here is a simple example i created using the game War Thunder.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fP-auYzAC7o

    Thank you!
     
  2. GingahNinja

    GingahNinja Member

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    Hi Furst, welcome to the forums. I actually have extensive amount of playing time in War Thunder as well and know what you mean by "screen shake".

    My opinion is this.
    1: It's a game. It won't always be 100% correct to how things were in real life.
    2:The plane you're flying appears to be the Tempest MkV with 4x 20mm cannons. If this is correct the shake is going to be that much more significant compared to say a P-51's 6x .50 caliber mg's.

    I would suggest that you take out a variety of aircraft in the game in a test flight and see how 7.7mm mg's, .50 cal mg's, 20mm cannons and 37mm+ cannons all have different amounts of recoil and thus causing the plane and the pilot to shake a bit.
     
  3. gumbyk

    gumbyk Well-Known Member

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    The location of the MG/Canon would have an appreciable effect too. Wing mounted MG's would provide less vibration than something firing through the propeller arc. There is simply more material to absorb the vibrations.
     
  4. razor1uk

    razor1uk Well-Known Member

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    Unless one/some of the MG's jam and produce asymmetrical forces and vibrations. Wing guns might produce less felt force because they're further from the pilot, though generally for many WW2 aircraft, the wing guns are the bigger ones in caliber /or the rate of fire to shot weight per second ratio.
     
  5. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forums, Furst.

    As far as gunnery forces are concerned, it depends on the simulator model and aircraft/weapon types.

    In CFS3, airframe models, especially the 1% models were very accurate in showing effects of weapons as they would have occurred (depending of the aircraft and it's armament). For example, P-39 firing it's .50 caliber MG had a noticable shake but the 37mm cannon rocked the pilot. Firing the Me262's MK108 cannon created plenty of shake, as well.

    IL-2 Sturmovik is pretty accurate as well, especially with the Me262A1/U4, which when fired not only effected forward airspeed, but also a blinding flash.

    These are just a few examples, but like I said, the "shake" created by the weapons are directly relevent to the aircraft type, weapon configuration and most importanly, the accuracy of the sim's modeling team.
     
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