first aircraft to attack japanese aircraft

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by nimrod.michaeli, May 7, 2009.

  1. nimrod.michaeli

    nimrod.michaeli New Member

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    i heard that the first aircraft to down an japanese aircraft during wwii was father and son having a ride on dec 7 when the attack happened

    is that correct

    if yes how many aircraft did they downed
     
  2. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    According to Wiki....

    "Lieutenants Kenneth Taylor and George Welch were staying at Wheeler for cards and dancing. They saw the planes burning and called the Haleiwa field to see if their planes were ok. They were and they took off in a car, dodging bullets. As they got there, the planes were gassed up, but not fully loaded. It did not matter as they took off. Out of the 23 planes shot down, the Lieutenants shot down seven. When they landed there was no ship that had not been hit, no place that had not been bombed. Most of the people were either wounded or dead."

    Charles
     
  3. Soundbreaker Welch?

    Soundbreaker Welch? Active Member

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    Kenneth Taylor and George Welch deserve credit for being the first to shoot down Japanese planes attacking the US, but there were was some other US pilots who fought the Japanese before that.

    The Flying Tigers, American pilots who joined the Chinese Air Force to fight the Japanese in China, shot down planes in China, flying P-40's.

    They didn't belong to the US Army Air Force, but they were there with the approval of the United States, even if it didn't admit it to Japan.
     
  4. ToughOmbre

    ToughOmbre Active Member

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    Not so Soundbreaker. The first combat mission of the AVG was December 20, 1941.

    It's a common misconception that the Flying Tigers were fighting the Japanese prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor.

    The John Wayne movie had it all wrong. But I still love the "Duke" anyway.

    TO
     
  5. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Japan invaded Shanghai during early 1932. I expect that China managed to shoot down a few Japanese aircraft during that battle.
     
  6. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    I would venture to guess that too, Dave. It's hard to believe that from 1932 to 1941, they didn't lose any aircraft to enemy fire. It all comes down to the man in the cockpit. Look at the Finns with the Brewster Buffalo. Even the P-26 Peashooter managed to down a few Japanese airplanes during the initial battle for the Philippines.
     
  7. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    I thought Zero fighter was invincible at the early stage of war:shock:
     
  8. Waynos

    Waynos Active Member

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    Nothing is invincible. It was the highest performing fighter in the region for a while but you can always be shot down if the other guy has a loaded gun.
     
  9. MikeGazdik

    MikeGazdik Member

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    I believe the question is about the Pearl Harbor attack. I have never heard of the father / son team. I have read many accounts of Taylor and Welch and the like. I did not recall them shooting down 7. If so, nice work! I also have confused myself as to if they were in P-36's or P-40's.
     
  10. Jerry W. Loper

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    The Zero enjoyed air superiority in the Pacific for about the first six months of the war because it was well-armed (two 20-mm. cannon plus two 7.7-mm. machine guns), very maneuverable, and unknown to Allied pilots. Allied pilots were able to deal with the Zero after learning its strong and weak points, and adjusting their tactics. By 1943, the Zero really should have been replaced by Japan's next generation naval fighter, but had to fight on to the end. (I recall reading that at the end of the war, more than half of all of Japan's single-engine, single-seat fighters were still Zeros.)
     
  11. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    A nice site. Unfortunately it only goes back to 1937.
    Hkans Aviation page - Sino-Japanese Air War 1937-45
     
  12. Messy1

    Messy1 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link to that site DB. I will have to look it over. I always enjoy being informed about another great site.
     
  13. Njaco

    Njaco The Pop-Tart Whisperer
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    Some interesting stuff....

    from the book "Pearl Harbor" by H. P. Willmott pgs 131 - 132

    "The Japanese missed Haleiwa Field, and it was from here that five American aircraft managed to get airborne. The first two aircraft to take off were credited with six victories over Ewa and Wahialua, but were somewhat fortunate to escape destruction when they were all but caught at Wheeler Field taking on more ammunition. Wheeler Field itself saw five of its aircraft take off, their pilots were credited with shooting down two Japanese aircraft for the loss of one of their own number. At Bellows Field three American aircraft attempting to get into the air were destroyed, one on the ground and the other two immediately upon take-off: only one pilot survived."
     
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