Gloss disaster!

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Angels one-five, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. Angels one-five

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    I am a big fan of modelmaster gloss lacquer as a clear coat, but have just has a bit of a disaster (all of my own making!).

    I use the aerosol cans for both gloss and flat and in my haste to finish a P51B, used a can which was running out rather than waiting until I'd time to get a fresh can. The bottom line is that I have ended up with a very uneven top coat - dreaded orange peel in some areas where the varnish has coughed and spluttered and not had enough volume to self level.

    What are my options for recovering this? Could I use micromesh to polish it back (assuming my LHS stocks it), or should I cut my losses and strip the whole model back to bare plastic before starting again? Any top tips welcome as I bang my head repeatedly against my desk!
     
  2. otftch

    otftch Active Member

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    I have had this happen and you can usually sand it with 800 grit sand paper very lightly and get to a smooth surface. Just sand it enough to get things looking right and then re-coat. With the laquers I like to wait at least a couple of day between coats. Don't bang your head, that will only break the desk !
    Ed
     
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  3. Aaron Brooks Wolters

    Aaron Brooks Wolters Well-Known Member

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    If you can find some 1500 to 2000 grit sand paper and lightly water sand the troubled areas, this should do the trick. Just be patient working it and keep an eye on they thickness of the clear and you should be ok. If you can't find any paper, PM me and I send you a couple sheets of each. 800 grit will work great to. Ed beat me to the post.:lol:

    Cheers;
    Brooks
     
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  4. Angels one-five

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    Thanks guys. Looks like a trip to the local hardware store is in order then. Thanks for the advice, I'll give it a go.

    Steve
     
  5. otftch

    otftch Active Member

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    #5 otftch, Dec 11, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2013
    Duh....forgot the wet sand part !
    Ed
     
  6. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Just keep in mind that when wet sanding, the paper cuts much faster. This is because the water keeps the grit open.
     
  7. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    and keep the rubbing light checking constantly as you go, don't want to cut it back too much....
     
  8. Angels one-five

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    I've ended up rubbing down further than I had hoped as it took a while to get a smooth finish agin, so in places I'm back to bare plastic.... no matter, surface looks lovely now and time for take 2!
     
  9. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Prepare to paint ....... paint!
     
  10. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    Years ago there used to be something called "Leveling spray". It was, I think, pure solvent, that would re-liquify slighly the paint allowing it to self-level. I used to use it on cars that I had painted with those small cans of "Dupli-color" to get a closer match between the new paint and old. Saved a lot of wet-sanding
     
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