Zambo

Recruit
3
4
Aug 16, 2022
Can anyone identify this Canadian WWII aircraft. 4th from the left, back row, is my father. He was stationed mainly at Ucluelet BC, Annette Island Alaska, and Pat Bay BC. I know that he flew in Stranraers, Bolingbrokes, Cansos, and briefly in Liberators. I don't know about others. The turret on the plane in the photo looks like that on a Bolingbroke, but the way the fuselage rises right in front of it is odd because the Bolingbrokes I see in photos appear to be quite evenly level along the fuselage top. It seems to me the size of the plane looks somewhat small for a Bolingbroke, but I can find no other aircraft with a turret like that.

I'm trying to add photos to a video interview I did with Dad a few years before he died.

Thanks for any help.
 

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EwenS

Staff Sergeant
1,005
1,958
Oct 19, 2021
It is a Fairey Battle Gunnery Trainer. A large number of these were shipped to Canada in early WW2 for use in various training roles.

 

Zambo

Recruit
3
4
Aug 16, 2022
Man, that was quick! Thanks very much for the ID and information. Ewen, that perfect photo tells the story immediately. And Crimea_River, the write-up that goes with your post explains a great deal about that plane. Interesting to know that the rear cockpit had been replaced on them with a Bristol turret (which is what had led me to wondering about the Bolingbroke). Dad had talked about doing gunnery training, so I imagine that would have been the aircraft used. I think that was at Mont Joli. Thanks again! That was most helpful.
 

Zambo

Recruit
3
4
Aug 16, 2022
Catch 22, you're right, the Harold Skaarup site is, indeed, very informative.
mjfur, from the photo, I can tell that the plane's number ends in either 3, 5, 6, or 8 -- and then 0. But I guess I'm happy just know that it's a Fairey Battle. :)
 

rinkol

Airman 1st Class
206
31
Jan 6, 2009
It is a Fairey Battle Gunnery Trainer. A large number of these were shipped to Canada in early WW2 for use in various training roles.

I recall seeing one of these at a museum in Alberta.
 

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