Interesting comparison of tank mobility

Discussion in 'WW2 General' started by tomo pauk, Dec 2, 2015.

  1. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Interesting comparisons.
     
  3. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    really interesting video, thanks Tomo!
     
  4. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    The Sherman tank doesn't seem to be as good as I thought it was.
     
  5. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    I will admit at being surprised at how well the Panther did
     
  6. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Me too. On the other hand, the Sherman received 1st the 'grousers' to widen the footprint, and later the new, wider tracks were produced. The Swedish did test the early, a bit narrower tracks on that Sherman Firefly. Interestingly enough, the shape (loosely a 'V') of track links/pads seem not to be such a good idea afterall.
     
  7. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
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    Interesting video! Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    #8 GrauGeist, Dec 2, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2015
    The "V" tracks actually did provide lateral traction to a certain degree, where the surface was uneven and covered in ice and or snow.

    At my former place of employment, we had a snowcat (1961 Thiakol Imp) that had straight "cleats" on it's tracks, which worked fine on level or incline/decline surfaces, but if we tried to traverse a road (or path) that had a slope to it, the snowcat wanted to slide sideways. This was usually in areas like the side of a mountain where slipping sideways off the road meant tumbling down 500 feet or more - making for a very stressful trip.

    I solved this problem by welding small "V" cleats (patterened after the Sherman, by the way) to the tracks and it performed well after that.
     
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  9. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    The first scientific explanation for WWII era tank mobility I've seen anywhere. That army training film deserves an academy award.
     
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  10. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

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    Great find thanks. Would have been interesting to see a T34/85 in the test as well. The section on hill climbing I could almost smell the clutch plates burning
     
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  11. parsifal

    parsifal Well-Known Member

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    Its an interesting comparison. I always understood it was a function of two main variables, ground pressure per m2 and power to weight ratio
     
  12. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    In looking back at the types used in the evaluation, it's actually a shame that all the main players in the war weren't compared, as they were readily available, like the King Tiger, the KV-1, Matilda and others.

    I know it would have been made for a lengthy movie (or video by today's standards) but certainly worth watching.
     
  13. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Tiger tank and German 3/4 tracks employed suspension similar to Panther tank so adding them probably wouldn't reveal much.

    T-34 would be a great addition as it uses suspension system different from all the test vehicles. Centurion and Pershing would be interesting too.
     
  14. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    The Tiger II (King Tiger) was over 23 tons heavier and had 9 guide wheels per side, so it would have been interesting to see it's performance based on the formulas used in the film.

    Same with the Soviet KV-1, which had 12 guide wheels per side, at a weight of 45 tons (just a shade over the Panther's weight). So a direct side-by-side comparison of the KV-1 and the Panther would have been great.
     
  15. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    That might be interesting as we'd get to see how early Soviet torsion bar suspension stacks up. Probably should have Panzer III for comparison purposes.
     
  16. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting stuff!
     
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