Japanese oldest living WW2 naval ace passed away today

Hiromachi

Airman 1st Class
236
97
Mar 2, 2014
Warsaw
元零戦パイロットの原田要さん死去 真珠湾攻撃など出撃:朝日新聞デジタル

800px-Kaname_Harada_2010.jpg


Mr. Kaname Harada at the age of 99 passed away early in the morning today, May 3, 2016.
Harada-san was the oldest living ace of the Imperial Japanese Navy, he was a participant of the infamous event of sinking of the USS Panay in 1937, the attack on Pearl Harbor and also the battle of Midway. Mr. Harada participated in Guadalcanal Campaign where his aircraft was badly damaged and he was wounded so much that was immediately transferred to Japan. Still, by the end of the war he reached a rank of Lieutenant and had more than 8,000 hours in the air recorded.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/04/w...t-sees-an-old-danger-on-the-horizon.html?_r=1

Here is one of the last interviews he gave, this one is in english for NYT.
 

bobbysocks

Chief Master Sergeant
3,926
283
Feb 28, 2010
Pennsylvania
it is interesting that the one Japanese hair salon owner stated he wasn't taught about the war in school. it is sad to see the wisdom and experience of these gallant souls leave us forever.
 

airminded88

Airman 1st Class
260
70
Mar 11, 2013
Texas, United States
Interesting to learn how two souls who met at Midway on opposing sides departed Earth so close from one another when the same could have been true for 1942.
A long life is a blessing.

RIP Warrior
 

Shinpachi

Major
10,246
7,811
Feb 17, 2008
Osaka
it is interesting that the one Japanese hair salon owner stated he wasn't taught about the war in school. it is sad to see the wisdom and experience of these gallant souls leave us forever.

There were not so many veterans who talked about their own war experience 'proudly' in public as they lost the war.
Instead, their families were listened persistently and repeatedly same story again and again by them. So was my family.

However, my father in law never wanted to talk about his experience even in front of his family.
He fought and survived the deadly Battle of Philippines
I was curious and asked him to tell me any story he experienced. He glanced at me for a moment and said "My comrades were dying in order of stupidity". That was all.

22 years ago when he was 70, he suffered stomach cancer. I happened to say to my wife "He survived the deadly battle. That would be enough".
To my surprise, she had told it to her father. I asked her "What did he say ?" She answered "He said The last war was one thing but this battle is another". He passed away at 70. :salute:
 
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