Jendrassik Cs-1 Turboprop Engine

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by davebender, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Early prototypes had technical problems but so does almost every new engine design.

    Could Jendrassik Cs-1 turboprop engine have been developed to the point of mass production? First run during 1940. Historical development stopped during 1941. Considering all the problems Germany had with BMW801 radial engine I think the Hungarian designed turboprop would have given them a second iron in the fire if it had been enlarged to 1,600hp. Runs on low octane fuel too.
     
  2. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    The artilce states the best he got was 400 hp. Nothing is mentioned about the gear box which on turboprops is a big factor with regards to performance and reliability. I think it was a good idea that was ahead of its time but probably not attainable during the period it was being developed.
     
  3. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    The Germans themselves have had enough problems developing producing the jet engines prior 1944. That is without reduction gear to worry about. The gas turbine might use the lower grade fuel, diesel etc. but it will use it more than the piston engine; much more for ww2 technology.
    The 'pure' jet, workable and mass produced, would be a better use of resources. It will have less problems to propel the aircraft above 500, let alone above 450 mph, too.
     
  4. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    The 11 stage turbine might have been a bit of a problem. Most jets using one or two stage turbines at the time. Any turbine design for the Germans that required high temperature alloy blades ( or fancy fabrication) should use the smallest number of blades possible in order to be manufactured in quantity.

    Gyrogy Jendrassik started his design before such considerations became really important and certainly deserves more credit than he commonly gets but the engine sounds overly complicated for what it offered compared to late war/early post war engines, but that is one of the penalties in being a pioneer. The war time and early post war engines seemed to max out at 6 stage turbines in the Metropolitan-Vickers with 2 stages to drive the compressor and 4 stages to drive either an aft fan/prop or bypass turbo fan. Otherwise I think 3 stages was the max in engines that actually saw service.
     
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