Jet engine tested at 10 times speed of sound

Discussion in 'Modern' started by syscom3, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    CANBERRA (Reuters) - An experimental jet engine has been successfully tested at speeds of up to 11,000 km (6,835 miles) per hour, or 10 times the speed of sound, during trials in Australia's outback, defense scientists said on Friday.

    The experimental scramjet engine is an air-breathing supersonic combustion engine being developed by Australian and U.S. defense scientists that researchers hope will lead to super-high speed flight.

    Scientists from Australia's defense Science and Technology Organization and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), used a conventional rocket to launch the scramjet high above the Woomera test site.

    The engine was then tested as it reached speeds of Mach 10.

    Scramjets need a rocket to propel the vehicle to high-speed before the engine can take over. They also need to operate in the thin atmosphere far above the altitude of commercial airliners.

    "All the indications are it was a success, and we have some very happy scientists," an Australian defense spokesman told Reuters on Friday.

    Flight data will be examined over coming weeks and compared to ground tests conducted in the United States, DARPA chief researcher Steven Walker said in a statement.

    "We are pleased with this joint effort between the U.S. and Australia and believe that a hypersonic airplane could be a reality in the not too distant future," Walker said.

    Scientists say the scramjet engine could lead to high-speed flights on long-range missions, as well as new low-cost ways to launch satellites into space.

    Jet engine tested at 10 times speed of sound - Yahoo! News
     
  2. Soundbreaker Welch?

    Soundbreaker Welch? Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Messages:
    1,900
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Still a student
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    Hypersonic.........
     
  3. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,197
    Likes Received:
    779
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    Just read that - pretty wild...
     
  4. R-2800

    R-2800 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    541
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    WAWA!!!!
    Location:
    New Jersey
    that's cool.
     
  5. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
  6. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    41,720
    Likes Received:
    517
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Doctor
    Location:
    Portsmouth / Royal Deeside, UK
    Home Page:
    Cool, will be interesting to see how fast they can get them too.
     
  7. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    Queensland
    Main problem would be the various metals and alloys for the other parts of the aircraft or whatever wouldn't it at that speed? The heat would burn it up pretty quickly wouldn't it unless it had very good heat-shielding. I mean the Space Shuttle gets exposed to very intense heat and only survives because it is for a very short period of time...
     
  8. spitfire101

    spitfire101 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    what do they mean by air-breathing exactly? does that mean it wouldnt be able to be on spaceships in space because theres no air?
     
  9. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    12,631
    Likes Received:
    309
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    It uses "air" from the atmosphere to support combustion.

    Even at very high altitudes where the density is very low, it can "scoop" up enough air just from the velocity its going.
     
  10. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    Messages:
    20,140
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Washington State
    Jet implies turbine in my definition. And it AINT a turbine engine. Think aerodynamically compressed air/gas mixture with an igniter. NOT a turbine compression of air, gas ignition that drives a secondary stage thus driving first stage compression.

    Completely different concept SCRAMJET, thus you don't have them of subsonic to hypersonic capability. You need a starter for SCRAMJET speeds.
     
  11. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    Queensland
    But that is just my point, even in the thin air at the edge of space wouldn't it get very hot on the outside metal travelling at 10 times the speed of sound?
     
  12. k9kiwi

    k9kiwi Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2006
    Messages:
    850
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    Self Employed
    Location:
    Kiwi Land
    Don't worry, if it fails it will cool down after it hits the sea. :shock:
     
  13. SoD Stitch

    SoD Stitch Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    981
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Heavy Equipment Rental
    Location:
    Pine Mountain Lake, California
    Yes, it would, even with the air being as thin as it is 100 miles up . . . the scramjets I've read about are made of heat-resistant alloys, such as titanium or stainless steel. There is no limit to the theoretical speed at which a scramjet can operate - theoretical scramjets can operate at Mach 20 or 30; the limitation is with the materials used to build the scramjet. Even ceramics have a thermal limit.

    There is also the problem of accelerating the scramjet to supersonic speeds in order to initiate combustion; this can only be done with either a supersonic "mother" craft (such as the Lockheed M-71), or with booster rockets, which are then jettisoned when the minimum combustion speed is achieved.
     
  14. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    Queensland
    Ah, okay I understand now. So that is their main problem?
     
  15. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    41,720
    Likes Received:
    517
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Doctor
    Location:
    Portsmouth / Royal Deeside, UK
    Home Page:
    Yes, that is just what he said :rolleyes:
     
  16. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Yeah but they make them out of special materials. Look at the SR-71 it travelled so hot that it was known to glow sometimes, did it just melt and fall apart? No...
     
  17. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,714
    Likes Received:
    1,053
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
  18. SoD Stitch

    SoD Stitch Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Messages:
    981
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Heavy Equipment Rental
    Location:
    Pine Mountain Lake, California
    The SR-71 consisted of about 85% titanium alloy and 15% composite materials (mostly ceramic-based); titanium is probably the most durable metal in the world, especially in high-heat situations. Parts of the aircraft get up to 400 degrees Celsius during sustained Mach 3 cruising speeds at altitude; any other metal besides titanium alloy or stainless steel would probably disintegrate and/or be severely weakened at those temperatures.
     
  19. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,767
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
  20. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    Queensland
    Thanks, interesting. I didn't know the metal combination in the SR-71 Blackbird.
     
Loading...

Share This Page