Mixing paint.

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Sweb, May 10, 2009.

  1. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    Okay, I'm showing a few gray feathers here but I have to ask if there are still folks who mix their own colors (colours, kulirs, etc)? There was a time when I had a chart I made showing how much of what went into making the various nation's military colors. Zip if I know where it went and when but I still prefer to do that and with enamels only. Acrylics are fine for poster painting, tee shirts and clogging a perfectly good Iwata if one is so inclined.
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Looks like we're both 'old school' Joe. I've only very recently tried acrylics, and then only due to not being able to get the enamels I wanted. I much prefer the versatility of enamels, and very rarely use a colour straight out of the tin. There are a couple of exceptions of course, such as the primary colours and black/white, and maybe RAF Dark Green (a great basis for many shades of green and 'earth' colours). Enamels can be used in so many ways, especially with a paint brush, where acrylics could not possibly cope with the particular technique and, as you quite rightly point out, don't clog the airbrush as acrylics do!
    At least 90% of the time, the 'military' colours I use are mixed as per requirements, the latter depending on scale, physical size of the model, the time period, location etc etc. One of the (minor) reasons I stopped attending the local (25 miles away!) branch of IPMS many years ago, was due to some 'rivet counters' pontificating on 'accurate' paint colours, and criticising others (not me, I must add) for a particular finish being, for example, 2,000's of a micron the wrong side of such and such a colour, when these same people hadn't even seen the real colour, or aircraft it was painted on!
    I still find it mildly amusing when people brand new to the modelling hobby 'must' have an airbrush, the 'proper' paints, in a myriad of colours and shades, and every other gadget available!
    Each to their own, of course, but I still can't understand why some individuals will buy one tin/bottle of a paricular colour, just for one tiny job, when the exact same colour could quite easily be mixed from available stock.
     
  3. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    One thing that charts do is endeavor to accurately represent the spectrum of period colors with regard to machines and when they were used. One thing they can't possibly depict is the weathering and forget about the dirt and exposure of specific theatres of operations or even the inconsistencies of color accuracy from base to base during those operations. With the latter in mind the color charts diminish in value to a one-eye-open reference. I hear you about the anal crowd of enthusiasts getting their drawstrings in a pucker about accuracy. But, at least we have them to honor and advance the history.

    I was at the local home supply store yesterday and bought the primary colors along with black and white in Rustoleum enamel. You can get them cheap in quart cans. Those are my military colors, or will be once I'm done with them. They are enamels. As a dabbler in fine art I use oils on canvas. When acrylics first hit the scene they were raved about. But, you had to use them with a water atomizer going to keep them from drying too quickly. I tried them but they just didn't want to work with me. Besides, I missed the smell and texture of oil paints so I switched back to them. Greasy, but good.
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Snap! I also paint. When 'Polymer' paints first appeared, in the '60's, I tried them, as they were a bit cheaper, but went back to oils. I have never, and will never, use acrylics for my paintings, prefering oils, like yourself. Actually, I only have a few true 'oil paints', as I now mainly use enamels on canvas! This happened by accident, probably about 25 years ago now, when I ran out of a particular colour, and needed to get a picture finished for a commission. Thinking along the lines that enamels are really only pre-thinned 'oil paints', I tried it, and have been using them ever since, in every form from Humbrol model paints, to ordinary household decorating enamels!
    They work beautifully, although I still use some traditional hues in 'proper' oil paints for some effects etc. You ought to give it a try, if you haven't already, it really is good.
     
  5. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    SACRILEGE, but a pretty dang good idea. I will try that. About the only advantage I can think of with traditional oils is use on a pallet, which I use, where their liquid brethren must remain in their containers until dipped into and transfered to the pallet. Just thinking out loud here. Adapting a new technique is a thought away. Great idea.
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I have to admit to some feelings of guilt when I first started using the enamels, but after a while this disappeared! I use some dish-type pallets usually, but there are times when the paint can be mixed thick enough to use on a traditional, wooden 'thumb' pallet.
    There are some useful advantages, especially for fine-line work, and, of course, the paint dries faster, and with a smooth surface (apart from the canvas texture of course), depending on weight etc.
     
  7. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Well. I'm an acrylics user and do mix (Tamiya) colours to get what I think is right! The Greys on my GB Me262 are mixed Tamiya colours....:D
     
  8. Zero Charlie

    Zero Charlie New Member

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    If I can find it I have a small booklet for mixing IMire Risley paints for different military colors, it might work for other paint brands if you like to mix you own.
    Zero Charlie
     
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