Mystery Landing Gear

Discussion in 'Technical Requests' started by Toby, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. Toby

    Toby New Member

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    Hi all

    I was wondering if anyone knows what aircraft this land gear might be from. The bolts bear the word 'associates' and a star. It also has a possible (part?) number of 35410, but other than that no markings. It was recovered from the sea, we think it's WW2, but it could concievably be later - discovered in the Thames.

    Any suggestions gratefully received.

    Thanks
     

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  2. razor1uk

    razor1uk Well-Known Member

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    #2 razor1uk, Aug 3, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2012
    Since as the scale appears to be in inches, and there is more info maybe required,..

    Does it seem to have an 'axle' area for a wheel to mount to (bent, broken or unknown connection/mount), any greasing nipples or hydraulic pipe connections and similar possible interesting engineering points?; like the possible uptravel or locking down stops on the 'shoulder' near the spar/structural rotational mounts, and the small lightweight U/C door/cover link if its not a 'swing (anti-twisting) link'.

    By its size - or lack of it, I'd say its certainly for a fighter-ish A/C; most likely single engined, unless its a hydraulic actuator, since it was found in what sounds like the Thames Estuary, then initially BoB related comes to mind.

    Possibles to check pics against for U/C design/componants.. Hurricane, Spitfire, Defiant, Oxford, Hudson, Hampden, Skua, Typhoon/Tempest; as a part of the U/C assembly, hence lack of long axle looking thing at its other end.
     
  3. Toby

    Toby New Member

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    Hi thanks for the response,
    The scale is in 10cm sections - so 1m in total. As far as I can tell, the axle for the wheel is at the bottom. The torque links have become detached from each other, and are on opposite sides now, presumably this happened on impact. Can't recall any nipples, hydraulics etc.
     
  4. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    That's an extremely short looking leg, as if it is the lower section of a jointed u/c leg. (It's even too short to be a Harvard leg for example)
     
  5. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Pehaps if the artifact's recovery location were logged, then two things:
    One, go back and look in the area for other peices of wreckage and two, check for any reports of downed Allied aircraft in the vicinity from 1939 onwards...

    "Downed" meaning either combat related or pilot/mechanical error.
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Evan, it's not that small. The main leg is approximately 40 inches long, and the stub axle assembly a total of 20 inches, with a space for 12 inch (approx) wide wheel. This would give a fairly large wheel diameter and corresponding tyre. I can't be sure, but it looks rather like the main leg assembly from a B-17. See the photos below, showing a B-17 leg recovered from a crash site in the Czech Republic. Note the attachment points at the top, and those for the retraction ram.
     

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  7. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    #7 FLYBOYJ, Aug 5, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
    The bolts are standard steel bolts from the period. This was taken from AC 43.13-1B
    [​IMG]

    Hard to tell if that part number was from the airframe manufacturer or from a landing gear manufacturer. Many times landing gear was designed by a second party - Menasco, Cleveland Pneumatic and Dowty were the big hitters.
     
  8. Toby

    Toby New Member

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    Hi everyone,
    Thanks for your responses, all really useful. Flyboyj that is great that the bolts can be matched. By 'period' are we talking 1939-45, or is it a bigger time-span? I'm not familiar with AC 43.13-1B; does this suggest it's a US aircraft?
    Thanks again.
     
  9. razor1uk

    razor1uk Well-Known Member

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    #9 razor1uk, Aug 5, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
    If not of American design, then certainly of American/Canadian (apologies if attributing US and Can' together offends Canadian's) made components.

    I think the linkages and possible attachment/stops would also aid identification - the 'swing linkages' in my eyes are too slim/small for a heavy bomber... though I am always welcoming real info to putting me and any others in-place... :)

    Thanks to FlyboyJ for the 'nuts', any Idea FBJ as to what years the fist 'Associates' nut corresponds to for possible production era/location A/C posibles as it seems the more likely lead so far t narrowing it down?

    I, in hindsight muse that 1m or colose to, for a fighter is most likely longer than needed, so a bomber/taining U/C might be more likely.
     
  10. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Hi Toby;

    AC 43.13-1B is a standard practices manual put out by the FAA for guidance when working on civilian US aircraft. Although a current document, a lot of its contents cover aircraft built over the past 60 years, really good information in this publication. There is a good possibility this might be from a civilian aircraft. Keep digging folks!
     
  11. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Cheers Terry, didn't realise it was so big. I judged on axle length and diameter in relation to the leg.
    (The red/white staff was meant to an inch stick, I take it)

    Great info there too Joe!
     
  12. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Evan, apparently the red/white staff is in 10cm (approx. 4 inch) increments.
     
  13. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    Look at a Douglas A-20 main gear, I can't find any scaled drawings of one, but it's looks possible.
     
  14. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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  15. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Does anyone have pics of a Martin Baltimore or Maryland MLG?
     
  16. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Just of a model Joe, but you could well be onto something there - does indeed look like the lower component!
     
  17. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Could be, but rather unusual if it is. Both of these types were only used in the MTO, and I believe shipped there direct, so odd to be found in the Thames Estuary. Of course, if it is one of these, it could have been on board a ship which was sunk.
    I'm looking for some good shots of the Hudson or Ventura main gear, but meanwhile, here's another possible contender. This is the main gear on a B-25 C, once at Duxford, now in the U.S., and both the C/D model and the 'J' were used by the RAF as the Mitchell II and III respectively. They were based at Fersfield, and then Dunsfold, and would have flown over the eastern part of the estuary on operations to the Continent.
     

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  18. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Yes, I'm thinking Hudson myself
     
  19. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Could be right, looks like the lugs are all in the right places. Pity I didn't have a scale when I took these.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  20. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Where did you see that Grant?
     
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