N number question

Discussion in 'Basic' started by hawkeye2an, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. hawkeye2an

    hawkeye2an Active Member

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    A question about N numbers. I am working on a display that will include a J-3 Cub in front of a dealer's hangar in the 1930s. As you can see, I have no way of knowing the N number involved. If it hasn't been sold yet, would it have an N-number? or were they assigned like auto license plates to the new owner?
     

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  2. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    "N" numbers really came about in the mid-late 1930s when the Federal Government finally took control of air commerce. Prior to that some states were trying to regulate and license aircraft and pilots from what I understand. That looks like a J-3 and more than likely it should have an N number that would begin with "NC."
     
  3. packardpursuit

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    In my opinion, more likely a Piper J-2, with Continental A-40 showing

    My '38 Aeronca KCA had "improved" A-50 which looks outwardly more modern, but is a cough really better than a wheeze??!! I miss her terribly, but she is still flying just as you see her here, in '06:

    http://www.popularaviation.com/PhotoGallery/3646.JPG

    "NC" registration, was re-applied at time of restoration, mid-late 70's(?). Originally alotted to and applied by the manufacturer. Piper in photo would have been the same.
     
  4. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Actually you are correct - You can tell by the curve of the aft side windows.

    :cool:
     
  5. hawkeye2an

    hawkeye2an Active Member

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    So you are saying that this airplane WOULD have N number at the dealership, even if it wasn't sold yet?

    If so, any suggestions on how I go about finding what it might have been?
     
  6. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Actually it would have been "NC."

    I can't find anything specific on what it would be besides starting with "NC." Many of these numbers were replaced in 1966. You could try these folks.

    J3-Cub.com Home
     
  7. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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  8. packardpursuit

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    Generally speaking, standard category licenced aircrt have an indentitiy as soon as the manufacturer assigns it one. This usually happens during assemblyat the factory and stays with the aircraft until it no longer officially exists. In the case of restored aircraft, the paperwork's existance is often enough to resurrect an aircraft that may no longer exists physically, and have it officially recognized as that aircraft Another way to go might be if the just the data plate, installed at the factory, was still extant.

    In the case of MANY WWII aircraft now flying, some wrecks have become others. It's quite a game. But if one can pull it off? Why not?
     
  9. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    All true - actually if you have a portion of the airframe and a data plate, you can basically build an older aircraft from the ground up. CubCrafters have been doing it for years. Where I work at we have 7 PA-18s that were "rebuilt" from the ground up, In reality they were brand new aircraft when delivered to us.
     
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