North American NA-73/A-36/P-51 Mustang Performance Chronology

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by CORSNING, Jun 29, 2014.

  1. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    #1 CORSNING, Jun 29, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2014
    I am attempting to put together a quick reference operational performance timeline for the Mustang. I am hoping to get the help needed to complete this reference. I have found that the more I researched and put it down on paper, the less I actually knew. What I have been able to put together looks like this:

    Version...Date Operational...Combat unit...Engine Power

    NA-73X: First flight October 26, 1940: V-1710-39/3,000 rpm: 1,050 hp./S.L., 1,095 hp./5,000 ft., 1,140 hp./10,000 ft.

    ACC: RAF forms the Army Cooperation Command on December 1, 1940. They are the first to fly the Mustang.

    Mk.I:......May 10, 1942......No.26 Sqn.(ACC)......V-1710-F3R: Same as V-1710-39

    Mk.I:......Four sent to USSR............................V-1710-39: 8,8:1 (8.77?) supercharger gear ratio

    Mk.I:......date?.............RAF unit?.......................V-1710-F21R: 7.48:1 supercharger gear ratio

    Mk.Ia:.....Aug. 1942......No.2 Sqn.......V-1710-F3R

    Mustang X (converted Mk.I A/C No.AL 975/G): First flight Oct. 13, 1942: Merlin 65: 1,315 hp. (First Rolls Royce version).

    Letter: From Allison Division dated Dec. 12, 1942 concerning the V-1710-F3R(-39) and V-1710-F4R(-173).
    1. 60"Hg boost has been agreed on by Allison: ~1,570 hp./3,000 rpm.
    2. 66"Hg boost is the boost control setting used in the Middle East: ~1,745 hp./S.L., 1,770 hp./2,000 ft.
    3. 70"Hg boost has been used by some pilots for prolonged periods in Australia: 1,780 hp./S.L.

    P-51:.....Apr. 9, 1943....154th Observation Sdn....V-1710-39/3,000 rpm: 1,150 hp./T.O./44.5"Hg, 1,150 hp./10,800 ft./43.9"Hg.

    Letter: From Headquarters, Northwest African Strategic Air Force APO 520, to Commanding General APO 650 concerning the Mk.I and Mk.Ia with V-1710-39:
    "The British have operated at full throttle at sea level (72"Hg) for as much as 20 min. at a time without hurting the engines. According to them, the Allison is averaging 1500 hours between bearing failures as compared to 500 to 600 hours for the Merlin. The Allison, they have found will drag them home even with the bearing ruined."

    A-36A production deliveries October 1942.

    P-51A production deliveries March 1943.

    P-51B-1 production deliveries May 1943.

    ACC is disbanded on June 1, 1943. The RAF Mustangs go to 2 Tactical Air Force (2TAF).

    A-36A:...Jun.6,1943.....27th Fighter-Bomber Group.....V-1710-87/3,000 rpm: 1,325 hp./T.O./47"Hg., 1,500 hp./52"Hg.

    P-51A:....Sep. 1943...23rd F.G./14th A.F.......V-1710-81: 1,200 hp./T.O./52"Hg, @ 57"Hg: 1,480 hp./5,000 ft., 1,480 hp./10,400 ft., 1,330 hp./11,800 ft.

    P-51C-1 production deliveries September 1943.

    P-51B:....Dec. 1, 1943....354th F.G./9th A.F.....V-1650-3/3,000 rpm: 1,380 hp./T.O./61"Hg., @ 67"Hg: 1,600 hp./15,600 ft., 1,330 hp./29,000 ft.

    P-51B-5:...date?...unit?...V-1650-3

    P-51B-7:...Dec. 1943...V-1650-3...85 gallon fuselage fuel tank installation begins at the factory.

    Mk.III: RAF begin operations in February 1944. They will be allotted 308 P-51Bs and 636 P-51Cs under Lend-Lease.

    XP-51F first flight February 14, 1944.

    P-51B-10:...Mar./Apr. 1944...unit?...V-1650-?

    P-51B-15:...(late April 1944?)...ETO Sdn.?...V-1650-7/3,000 rpm: 1,490/T.O./61"Hg., @ 67"Hg: 1,720 hp./6,250 ft., 1,505 hp./19,250 ft.

    P-51D-5:...Arrive late May 1944...354th 4th F.G./9th A.F. under command of the 8th A.F.....V-1650-7

    100/150 Grade fuel: Deliveries begin to the 8th A.F. on June 10, 1944. Boost levels for V-1650-7 are raised to 72-75"Hg.

    Mk.III / V-1650-7 used as interceptors in defense of England use up to +25 psi.(80.8"Hg) boost: 1,940 hp./S.L., 1,810 hp./12,000 ft.

    XP-51G: First flight August 9, 1944. Note: First flight was with a 5-blade propeller. Three days later the aircraft is flown with a 4-blade Aeroproducts propeller.

    P-51D/K:......Sep. 1944.....ETO unit?.....V-1650-7

    P-51D/K:......Dec. 1944.....PTO unit?.....V-1650-7 (A/C arrived in Nov. 1944

    F6D:.........Nov. 1944....82nd Recon. Sdn........V-1650-7

    P-51H: First flight February 3, 1945

    P-51H: A few sorties were flown in a combat area durring the last two weeks according to some pilots in the squadron(s) that were gearing up for operational status at the end of WW2.

    Any corrections or additions to the reference are greatly appreciated, Jeff.
     
  2. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Hi Corsning, a couple of bits of info, will add more when I have time. The Mustang I first flew on 23 April 1941, flown by Lewis Walt. The first Merlin engined Mustang to fly was a converted Mk.I, AL975-G, fitted with a two speed two stage Merlin 65 and converted by Rolls Royce at Hucknall. Its first flight was on 13 October 1942. Five of these conversions were made at Hucknall, they recieved the designation Mustang X. 1,315 hp Merlin 65 detail as follows RM.10.SM, with 150 octane fuel, the Merlin 65 "...gave just over 2,000 hp at sea level at 3,000 rpm, using +25 lb boost and 1,880 hp at just over 10,000 ft in FS gear. At +18 lb, 3,000 rpm, 100 octane fuel the engine would give about 1,780 hp in MS gear at just over 5,000 ft and 1,610 hp at 15,000 ft in FS gear." Quoted from Lumsden, British Piston Engines and their Aircraft. AL975 also received a Merlin 70.

    The first US Merlin conversion was one of the P-51s that came from the initial US order for 150 examples, of which only 55 entered USAAF service as photo recon F-6As, the rest went to the RAF as Mustang IAs, apart from two, which became the XP-51B prototypes, initially designated P-78, as the Merlin engined Mustang was originally designated by the Americans. The first Merlin engined XP-51B to fly first flew on 30 November 1942 with a Rolls Royce built Merlin 61. I'm a bit pressed for time right now. I'm also keen to add to the Spitfire timeline.
     
  3. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    A couple of things.. P-51B-7 was a mid -5 production break which added 85 gallon tank as a production item.. otherwise pure -5 with 1650-3 engine.

    P-51B-10 arrived in ETO in late March/early April

    P-51D-5NA arrived in 354 and 4FG in late May, rest of 8th AF in early June.

    A-36A production deliveries October 1942

    P-51A production deliveries Mar 1943

    P-51B-1 Production deliveries in May 1943

    P-51C-1 Production deliveries Sept 1943

    XP-51F flies first time Feb 1944

    P-51D-5 Production deliveries March 1944, arrive in ETO in May 1944

    P-51B arrive in MTO in April 1944

    Order placed for 1000 P-51H June 1944

    XP-51G fastest and highest ceiling P-51 flies in Aug 1944

    P-51K deliveries start in August, 1944 - many rejected because of Aero Products prop system

    P-51K arrives in ETO September 1944

    P-51D/K arrives in PTO November 1944 but does not enter combat until December 1944

    P-51H production/first flight Feb 3, 1945

    Only P-51M (Dallas based P-51H) produced August, 1945

    August 15, 1945 all production ceases with 15, 484 Mustangs through D/K series plus 1000 Australian built or on production lines.

    August 15, 1945 has 370 P-51H's delivered, production stops in November with total of 555.
     
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  4. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    #4 CORSNING, Jul 1, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
    Hi nuuumannn, thank you for the information on the Mustang X.

    Hi drgondog, I was hoping you would bring your knowledge of the Mustang to this thread.

    My original intention is to make a list of when each version of the Mustang entered operational service with the following information: 1. Model., 2. Date of first fully operational A/C., 3. Combat unit., 4. Engine used and power available. The exceptions would be the first flight of the original prototype and now the first flight of the Merlin powered model. I thought this would make a quick reference allowing each version of the Mustang to be easily compared to its counterparts. Just like the other two PERFORMANCE CHRONOLOGYS that I started and this sites members helped put together: the Messerschmitt Bf.109 and Spitfire.

    I have added the information on the first Merlin powered Mustang and information corrections and additions to operational A/C.

    Thanks guys, Jeff.
     
  5. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Just a wee note, 26 Sqn received its first Mustangs at Gatwick in January 1942 after the aircraft had arrived from the USA and had been delivered to Speke, Liverpool for testing prior to delivery to the squadron. 10 May was the date of the first operational Mustang sortie, although the aircraft had been in service since January.

    The Mustang IA first entered RAF service with 268 Squadron in July 1943, not 1942. The IA had the same Allison V-1710-39 as the Mustang I. Also, the RAF received 50 P-51As as Mustang Mk.IIs, powered by the Allison V-1710-81, the first entered RAF service with 2 Sqn (off the top of my head) in May 1944 (might be wrong with that though).

    Since you've added the formation of the Army Co-operation Command, it might be worth adding that the ACC was disbanded on 1 June 1943 and subsequent RAF Mustangs served with Fighter Command under No.2 Tactical Air Force (2TAF). When the USA entered the war, RAF Mustangs were received from USAAF production batches under Lend Lease, rather than paid for when the USA was not at war, as the RAF's Mustang Is were. It might also be mentioned that the Mustang was built for the British and that the USAAF interest was only in passing - contractual - and that before the Mustang entered service with the US, the Army felt it had its own decent fighters in the P-38 and P-47. Once the P-51s entered service with the Army, it took awhile before attitudes changed enough for it to be regarded as something more than just a ground attack aircraft.

    Once the Merlin was fitted, and realise that this work was done to supply the RAF from the outset, not the American units (I noticed you put "First Rolls Royce version" in the text next to ther Mustang X; Rolls did this work for the RAF, not the USAAF and although Packard were already building the V-1650-1, one idea for the Mustang was that Rolls would supply the Merlins and NAA the airframes, but Spitfire IXs took priority over two-speed two-stage Merlin production, hence Packard building the V-1650-3. Another idea was that Gloster was to build the airframes in Britain), it was only once its performance advantages over existing types became apparent that the US Army began to sit up and take note. Orders for P-51Bs for Army service also included the RAF aircraft under Lend Lease, but because the Americans realised their shortfall in useful aircraft over main land Europe, the RAF production aircraft were diverted to the USAAF before the RAF received their own, and both received P-51Bs (RAF Mustang IIIs) in December 1943, with the American units taking priority.

    More later and I might be able to correct any mistakes I've made as well! Gotta go do an oil change on my car.
     
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  6. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    nuuumannn,
    Thank you for the information. I am out of time tonight also but will look your post over better as soon as possible and make the corrections.

    Jeff
     
  7. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    Bill and nuuumannn,
    Thank you two so much for all the valuable information you have provided so far. You two have made the quick reference Mustang Performance sheet a very valuable asset as far as I am concerned.


    nuuumann,
    Your post #5 had some excellent information in it. I am trying to keep the original list as a quick reference. One thing though, both my references give the operational debut of the Mk.Ia as August or Summer (AHT by F. Dean) 1942.

    Jeff
     
  8. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Yes, looks like you're right, Jeff. 2 Sqn was the first, I think and received Mustang IAs in June or July 1942. 171 also had them by September '42, but the other users of the IA didn't receive them until 1943. Nice work, by the way. These are handy.
     
  9. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    Yes, looks like you're right, Jeff. 2 Sqn was the first, I think and received Mustang IAs in June or July 1942. 171 also had them by September '42, but the other users of the IA didn't receive them until 1943. Nice work, by the way. These are handy.[/QUOTE]

    nuuumannn,
    Thank you for the complement and thank you for the squadron information. With all these aircraft comparison threads that have been active lately I thought these chronicals would be an excellent quick reference for dates. I have started kicking around the Fw 190A-Fw 190D-Ta 152. What do you think?

    Jeff
     
  10. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    #10 nuuumannn, Jul 8, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
    Hi Jeff, Oops double post, see below. (Slow computer in remote rural location...)
     
  11. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    #11 nuuumannn, Jul 8, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
    Hi Jeff, you're welcome for the compliment. :) Yes, do the Fw 190/Ta 152 - there are many Luftwaffe Experten here who will gladly submit information toward it.

    Just to add more to the Mustang IA saga, the order for the NA-91 was placed by the US Army on 25 September 1941 for British requirements under Lend Lease, receiving the US designation P-51 for contractual purposes. Of course, only 93 went to the British as Mustang IAs, the rest becoming F-6A recon aircraft for the USAAF, and as we know, two of these became the prototype XP-51Bs when fitted with Merlins in late 1942, early 1943...
     
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  12. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    If I start a Focke-Wulf 190 performance chronical, I am going to need a lot of input from the members here. I am not well versed on it an do not have much Fw quality material. I am presently searching through all my books and Air Enthusiast/Internationals for enough information to at least put together a skeleton of information to get it started.

    So all I can say for now is, I'm working on it.

    Thanks for all the help, Jeff.
     
  13. BiffF15

    BiffF15 Well-Known Member

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    Jeff,

    When you do the broadcast for help it might be useful to do chronological increments (to prevent info overload)...

    Cheers,
    Biff
     
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  14. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    Like first few years first :)

    Logical as it keeps the Long nose stuff out of the way until the early stuff gets sorted.
     
  15. CORSNING

    CORSNING Active Member

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    Shortround and Biff,
    I believe both of you are dead on. I'll see what I can put together in the next few day and get it rolling.

    Thank you all for the support and help, Jeff.
     
  16. grampi

    grampi Member

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    This isn't really a "performance" chronology, it's more of a specification chronology....a performance chronology would list items like climb performance numbers, speed numbers, fuel consumption, how much weight the plane could carry, etc....
     
  17. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    It is certainly a starting point and some of the numbers don't really change than much for a given type of airplane. Fuel consumption for a Mustang isn't going to change much for the Allison powered versions and after the change to the Merlin versions it will stay pretty much the same for all speeds under max speed. A two stage Merlin turning 2400rpm and using 4lbs boost uses about the same amount of fuel as any other 2 stage Merlin using the same rpm and boost and if installed in similar air frames ( difference in fuel consumption between a razor back P-51 and a bubble top P-51?). How much weight they could carry? Allison P-51s could carry a pair of 500lb bombs and Merlin P-51s could carry 1000lbs as a general rule.

    If the idea of these Chronologies is to straighten out the particular type of aircraft's different models into first production and/or first service use I think they are a valuable resource.

    There are lots of places to find climb numbers, speeds and bomb/tank loads but too many times we have people arguing over which different type could do what when.

    Being able to just find (in one spot):

    "P-51B-1 production deliveries May 1943"

    "P-51B:....Dec. 1, 1943....354th F.G./9th A.F.....V-1650-3/3,000 rpm: 1,380 hp./T.O./61"Hg., @ 67"Hg: 1,600 hp./15,600 ft., 1,330 hp./29,000 ft."

    "P-51B-7:...Dec. 1943...V-1650-3...85 gallon fuselage fuel tank installation begins at the factory."

    Answers a lot of questions/arguments about what the Early Merlin P-51s could do when.

    Trying to include too much information may clog things up and make it hard to read/extract information.
     
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  18. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    I agree and think it is a very useful way of presenting information. It also enables other forum members to add info that might be missing, to broaden the knowledge base. Good work Jeff.
     
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