Odd Airspeed Gauge.

Discussion in 'Technical Requests' started by Orion2012, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. Orion2012

    Orion2012 New Member

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    [​IMG]

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    Can anyone identify this odd gauge, or even narrow down its time period (Pre-or Post WW2) I would greatly appreciate it. I'm intreseted in purchasing the gauge to add to my collection of antique avionics gauges. I've exhausted all of my knowledge.
     
  2. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    I'm guessing its prewar - if I'm reading it right the aircraft it was installed in stalled at 70 and had a VNE of 220 and Va of 120
     
  3. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Orion,

    >Can anyone identify this odd gauge, or even narrow down its time period (Pre-or Post WW2) I would greatly appreciate it. I'm intreseted in purchasing the gauge to add to my collection of antique avionics gauges. I've exhausted all of my knowledge.

    I'm not an expert, but a similar gauge of German origin was just recently featured in Flugzeug Classic (if I remember correctly).

    It has a special arrangement that allows the pilot to set a desired airspeed by rotating the knob. This does not rotate the hands, but rather the entire gauge, which would be installed so that the desired airspeed is in the 3 o'clock position of the gauge. (Note that some numbers on the instrument are upside down until rotated.)

    The idea is to install this airpseed indicator on the left hand side, the artificial horizon in the middle and the vertical speed indicator on the right. As long as both the airspeed indicator and vertical speed indicator hands are in line with the horizon bar, the pilot is flying straight and level at constant speed. If anything moves out of alignment, he knows that he has to correct his flightpath or airspeed.

    Regarding the green and yellow hands, I agree with Flyboyj, but the red marking in my opinion is the desired speed. As colour-coding according to my superficial knowledge only was introduced during WW2, a pre-war origin seems unlikely, but as I pointed out, I'm not an expert and could easily be wrong.

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  4. Orion2012

    Orion2012 New Member

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    Thanks for the information, I defenetly think Ill buy it.
     
  5. SABURO

    SABURO Member

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    This is the information I found on the RAAF instruments location book, did get from Australia...
    Some explaination about the RAAF Ref.:G106A/50031-2
    G106A = Australian Ref.(G) U.S. origin(10) / -2 (at the end) = reworked from MPH to KNOTS.

    G106A/50031-2 - Air-Speed Indicator
    Pioneer ; MFR’S Part N° 1423-3G-A2 ; 0-220 Knots ; Rotatable Dial ; Luminous.
    Douglas C-47 / C-47A ; Noorduyn UC-64 Norseman ; CAC CA-6 Wackett Trainer.

    The color code was use post-war at least once on the L-1649A Starliner ASI.

    Cheers , Olivier
     

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  6. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Good info Oliver - the color coding is commonly used on all airspeed indicators today

    [​IMG]
     
  7. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Flyboyj,

    >Good info Oliver - the color coding is commonly used on all airspeed indicators today

    In my above post, I failed to notice that there are actually two red markings, a red indicator on the rim and a red sector towards the middle.

    Just as you pointed out, the red sector must be part of the airspeed colour coding system.

    When I said the red marking would indicate the desired speed, I was thinking of the needle on the rim, missing the red sesctor. Sorry for the confusion I may have caused - you were right all along!

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
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