P-51 NAA/NACA 45-100 airfoil graph

Discussion in 'Flight Test Data' started by greybeard, May 15, 2015.

  1. greybeard

    greybeard Member

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    Hi all!

    I was unable to find graph showing coefficients of lift and drag as a function of angle of attack about early Mustangs (P-51A/B/C/D) airfoil. What I'm looking for it's like following graph:

    NACA_65_1-212.jpg

    extracted from NACA report No.824 "SUMMARY OF AIRFOIL DATA", dated 1945, that seemingly should include all airfoil data but misses the 45-100.

    Any help?
     
  2. greybeard

    greybeard Member

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    It's curious this lack of info about the most famous WW2 American fighter...

    Thanks anyway,
    GB
     
  3. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    Be patient, greybeard :)

    When I asked about a B-29 nose art, there was no answer for half a year but several people were kindly checking to answer.
     
  4. hlppls45

    hlppls45 New Member

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    The Mustang airfoil was not a standard airfoil but used the basic airfoil data combined with modifications to meet specific pressure distributions along the wing panel. If you have one of the drawing cd sets, the information can be found in the wing analysis document.
     
  5. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    It was a NAA proprietary airfoil design modified from a NACA Laminar flow airfoil.. IIRC the pressure distribution desired then was washed through an NAA proprietary Theodorsen transformation to generate the X-Y co-ordinates.
     
  6. Algernon

    Algernon New Member

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    Gentlemen, Mustang airfoil — but only from „other side“. German report from 1943. (Measured on Mustang mainplane, in 1943 — most probably from any forced-landed or belly-landed airplane.)

    Text in Czech language —
    scan 0001 : drag coefficient (x, or horizontal), lift coefficient (y, or vertical)
    Mustang airfoil compared with NACA 2415 airfoil
    scan0001.jpg

    scan 0002 : pressure distribution
    ssací strana : suction side (or upper wing surface)
    tlačná strana : lower wing surface
    scan0002.jpg

    scan 0003, 0004 : Airfoil coordinates, scan 0004 compared with NACA 6 laminar flow airfoils (NACA 65,2—016)
    scan0003.jpg
    scan0004.jpg

    More details probably in:
    “Bericht Braunschweig 43/7 (1943)”
    H. Doetsch “Versuche am Tragflügelprofil des North American Mustang”, FB 1712/1 (1943), 1712/2
    K. Bussmann “Messungen am Laminarprofil P-51 Mustang”, FB 1724 (1943)
    Breford Möller “Messungen am Originalflügel des Baumusters P-51 Mustang”, FB 1724/2

    In german (or D.V.L.) this airfoil is described (in five digits) as 1,6—50—13,6—0,825—39
    1.) is 1.6 per cent maximum airfoil camber
    2.) maximum camber in 50 per cent airfoil chord line
    3.) maximum thickness
    4.) radius (in per cent) of leading edge
    5.) max. thickness is on 39 per cent of airfoil chord
     
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  7. greybeard

    greybeard Member

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    Algernon,

    I apologize for the long delay, but I had lost track of this thread.:oops:

    Thank you heartily: the search must have been hard and labourious!

    Definitely, it looks an unique case!

    It's a pity that it lacks of diagram of lift as a function of angle of attack. Indeed, there's the partial derivative of Cz as a function of alpha, but too much time has passed from when I performed an integral last time!

    Thank you all for your support and additional information!

    Kind regards,
    GB
     
  8. tanze

    tanze New Member

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    Hello,

    I found some data on an italian article from 1947.
    Italian researches were doing reverse engineering by comparing laminar airfoils from wrecks or captured aircrafts.
    Attached are at least some data coming from a P51 shot down by the luftwaffe during the war.
    Reynolds nr. was around 2.7*10^6

    Copia di 00043.jpg
     
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