P51A

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by rogerwilko, Jun 27, 2014.

  1. rogerwilko

    rogerwilko Member

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    If you go to wikipedia under mustangs this picture blows up huge to show a smiling pilot. No wonder! Wonder what his name is (was)? [​IMG]
     
  2. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    Bob Chilton is a possibility
     
  3. rogerwilko

    rogerwilko Member

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    I'll look him up.
     
  4. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    Chief Test pilot NAA
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Think it probably is him Bill. A caption to this photo in one of my books names him.
     
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  6. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    I know this is going to sound pedantic, but its an early P-51 as opposed to P-51A. The first Mustangs the USAAC received were diverted from RAF Mustang IA production batch and were designated NA-91 by the manufacturer, but simply P-51 by the Army. A number were fitted with cameras and became F-6s. The P-51A differed in the armament fit in that it had four .50s in the wings, not the cannon as this one clearly has. Nice picture. The wiki caption confirms this: "P-51 Mustang on a test flight, October 1942; this particular aircraft (41-37416?) may have been allocated to the RAF as a Mustang 1A."
     
  7. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    The first NA-91s that the USAAC acquired, had the 4 20mm Hispano cannon with the cowl armament deleted (like this photo suggests) and were only 150 units. Once the USAAF took over, these NA-91s were redesignated P-51 Apache.
     
  8. Koopernic

    Koopernic Active Member

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    The aircraft has absolutely no tail number or specific identifiers at all. How is this even legal?
     
  9. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Despite the US ordering 150 of them, only 57 actually went to the USAAC, the other 93 went to the RAF as Mustang IAs and of the 57, 55 were F-6A recon aircraft. The remaining two became XP-78s, the original US designation of the Merlin engined Mustang and were later redesignated XP-51Bs. These were fitted with British Merlin 61s and were the first American Merlin engined Mustangs, although the British flew a Merlin engined Mustang before the Americans. The name Apache was assigned to the A-36 dive bomber. The A-36 was the first Mustang variant to go into US service.
     
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