Paint strainers?

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Lucky13, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Can you get paint strainers that suits the airbrushes that we use?

    Or are the big ones the only game in town?

    paper_cone_paint_strainers__29757.jpg
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Shouldn't really need a strainer for modelling paints old boy. Those advertised are for use by decorators, or perhaps car body shops, where a 'quick' mix is required. Even then, it is in a way defeating the end result, as straining will leave some pigment in the strainer, which should have been mixed with the carrier. They are, to an extent, a 'lazy man's' way of stirring the paint without too much effort.
    Modelling paints are made with much, much finer pigments, in a more refined carrier (hence, in part, the higher price per ml), and should be stirred thoroughly. A very fine mesh, like 'Sylon', or ladies tights, might catch some pigment, but to achieve the desired finish and shade, this pigment really needs to be separated and included with the rest of the strained paint, and stirred in.
     
  3. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Was just thinking, as sometimes, with all the opening and closening of paint jars/bottles, I seem to get some sh*t in the airbrush and I'll have to open and clean again...

    Bl**dy annoying! :lol:

    Worked with them things for a few years, two years in school, painting cars etc., then for the military painting them lovely greens, browns etc.. :lol:
     
  4. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    I used to do a lot of spray painting in my sign shop, with an automotive gun. When I strained my paint thru the paper strainers, I would run thinner thru the strainer to clear it so I got All of the pigments. The paper strainer is used to keep the rocks and pebbles out of the gun!

    When I used sign painters paints from quart cans I did a little prep to start the can. Put the can in a paint mixer, the shaker type to get all the pigment mixed. Then I poked a hole in the edge of the lid, 1/8" or so and screwed a 3/8" short lag screw, hex head wood screw, into the hole. When I needed paint I removed the screw and pumped it out like an old oil can. I only used a few ounces at a time. I replaced the screw and gave the can a good shake. This mixed the gasses with the air that replaced the paint. I could use the whole quart, and when the lid was removed it was as clean as a whistle inside. Never lost even a teaspoon of paint.

    Just sayin!
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Sounds good Bill, and not unlike a system I used when i used to often paint, or re-paint my rally cars (and other peoples). The main problem with modelling paints is the small volumes they're supplied in - it only takes a small amount of dried paint, or air, to get into the tin/bottle to accelerate decomposition. And with a particular, once best in the world brand, that problem is BIG !
     
  6. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    ....or any dried paint, around the lid etc., fall into airbrush and clogg it up!
     
  7. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    keep the lid and edges clean and you should be ok for a period, i sometimes run the paint through a bit of womens stocking slightly stretched over a small funnel if I think a bottle may have some flakes of paint in it, does the job!
     
  8. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I never use the paint straight from the tin. Normally, I use a medium-sized brush to transfer some paint into a small, clear plastic shot glass (after the paint has been stirred a minimum of 50 'revolutions'), then stir it again. The thinners is then added, the paint re -stirred/mixed, and then transferred to the airbrush cup, keeping the shot glass at a shallow angle.
    Paint around the tin lid and rim sometimes needs to be left, in order to seal the tin, as the quality of the tins is not as good these days. When this starts to interfere with the sealing, the solid paint is carefully cut away with a scalpel, the blade always moving away from the rim to prevent dried paint particles falling into the tin, and any residue is then wiped off. Similar action is taken on the tin lid.
    Once the paint is down to the last 1/8th or so, it's disposed of, as the current Humbrol paint will, by then, be virtually unusable - if it's lasted that long in the first place!
     
  9. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Damn shame they messed with the mix Terry
     
  10. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Humbrol used to be good indeed! :(
     
  11. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    They certainly did! Ever since the factory on Humberside closed down, it's never been the same - only the name remains, and heaven only knows where the stuff is made now, or by whom.
     
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