Painting Yellow

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by dirkpitt289, Apr 7, 2010.

  1. dirkpitt289

    dirkpitt289 Active Member

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    I know this question was answered here recently but I forget the answer or the thread in which it was asked so let me apologize up front. the question is what is the best way to spray Yellow and for that matter white? Should a base cote of another color be used first? :?:
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Both colours are best going onto a previously painted surface, but of course this is not always possible. In theory, there shouldn't be a major problem painting either of these colours, especially spraying, unless on small areas, and paricularly compound curves such as spinners. Basically, lay down the first coat as evenly as possible, let it dry, then build up the 'depth' with further thin coats. It's sometimes easier to paint, for example, a matt yellow undercoat, and then follow this with gloss yellow; the final finish can be achieved with the relevant clear coat varnish. The same goes for white and red, the other two 'difficult' colours.
    On the Bf109 model I'm currently 'restoring', the yellow wingtips were achieved with two coats of acrylic, sprayed over the enamel base colour green camouflage, allowing the first coat to dry thoroughly before spraying the second.
    If you are using acrylic paints, then you'll find it easier to spray onto a base of matt enamel, white in both cases (white or yellow finish).
     
  3. dirkpitt289

    dirkpitt289 Active Member

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    So in your opinion (If I understand what you are saying) the Silver/ Aluminum base of my minicraft B24 should be enough of a base as long at the cotes are lite and even. Correct?
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Ah! With a metallic surface, in this case 'silver', the 'solid' colour(s) should be applied first, otherwise there will be a recation with the 'silver' paint, where metallic pigment 'migrates' into the solid colour. It's OK to spray metallic onto solids, but problems can occur the other way around. However, if you have no choice, then apply a thin coat of matt white first, and let this thoroughly dry. If it then shows a slightly 'speckled' look, this is the metallic particles showing in the white, and should be lightly rubbed-down, followed by a second thin coat of white, Once this is dry, then the required colour can be appled, again probably in two or more coats, drying between coats.
     
  5. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Good explanation Terry!

    Anytime I use Yellow or white it goes on after a light sanding of 800-1200 grade sandpaper, straight on the surface(s) of the plastic, light even coats built up. It is left for a couple of days then masked and painted over...
     
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