Part ID

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Wildcat, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

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    Fellers, I was given this yonks ago by my Mum (don't know where she got it from) and was wondering if anyone know's what type of a/c it is from.
    The only serial number on it is - AN 3022-8B plus a GH under the toggle switch.
    Any info appreciated.
     

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  2. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    The AN 3022-8B is probably the part number. If it falls under the old way we used to do part numbers, the AN stands for Army/Navy, which would include the Air Force. I can't be absolutely sure, but didn't a lot of aircraft share that switch? Joe?
     
  3. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Eric, sorry for the late reply mate I forgot I posted this :rolleyes:I understand that this is probably a generic switch used in many aircraft, but can anyone add anything else? WWII vintage? or post war?
    Thanks.
     
  4. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Eric hit the nail on the head about the part number, basically its a standard part and could of been installed on any number of aircraft. Originally manufactured in the war years, it was probably manufactured years after the war.
     
  5. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

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    Cheers for that Joe.
     
  6. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    Standard SPST (Single Pole Single Throw) switch that was used, in this case, to arm the gun and gun-camera solenoids. It closed the circuit between the guns and gun-camera with the gun trigger switch. Some aircraft had one switch that armed all gun solenoids (P-47 according to my Pop) while others had one for each gun (F4U-series left console Ref: Whistling Death).

    The AN is the old part numbering system and was the abbreviation for Army-Navy. Now we use MS (Military Standards) and are slowly evolving to standards like NAS (National Aerospace Standards). All of them are being identified and described in applicable ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) specifications and will culminate in one standard for products and materials. Unfortunately, the old specs are free (public domain) on-line in most instances. ASTM documents must be purchased.

    The topic switch can probably be Googled by its AN spec number. Responses will also probably reveal its national stock number for similar products.

    Edit: The red guard over the switch is not part of the switch. It's an accessory. The switch itself looks like an old Cutler-Hammer standard. Same for the guard. The guards were obviously designed to prevent unintentional closing of the switch or they were used to "capture" the switch to prevent unintentional opening of it. I work with this stuff all the time as an A&P.
     
  7. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Good one sweb...
     
  8. Aaron Brooks Wolters

    Aaron Brooks Wolters Well-Known Member

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    Interesting guys, thanks Wildcat. Cool switch.
     
  9. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Sweb. Appreciate the info mate.
     
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