Part Identifications

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by FLYBOYJ, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    OK guys, I'm stumped on this one. I recently acquired these two part which I am told came from Edwards AFB by North Base. I was told that the place where they were discovered once contained several wrecks. One is some kind of drain; by the size of it I guess oil. It does have a part number SKN1036522-9 with a round inspection stamp "R" 847. Six Allen head cam locs hold it in place so it was designed to be removed. I'm guessing this might have come from a QEC assembly built by Rohr Industries.

    The second part is a scissor link, no part number. One of the bolts is still installed on one end, an NAS 501 which is a close tolerance bolt.

    "Batter up"

    :)
     

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  2. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Good scores Joe!

    Interesting aerofoil section of that first piece, suggesting mouth of tube in direction of airflow (internally of course). Have seen such a form before on a model too, trying to recall which...

    How common were lightening holes on US scissor links too? First impression to me is 'something German', may well be wrong of course...
     
  3. model299

    model299 Member

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    #3 model299, Jul 24, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2012
    That first part looks to me like it was designed to extend out into the airstream, possible a relief tube drain? Or a fluid drain for oil or something from an engine nacelle? Are there internal threads on that connection point, or was it designed for some sort of clamp connection in conjunction with a hose assembly? (That's what it looks like to me.)

    That second part looks like a miniature tail wheel oleo strut. Or perhaps it was used to pull a door or cover shut from the looks of the attachment point at the knee joint.
     
  4. gumbyk

    gumbyk Well-Known Member

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    The direction that the first part has been angled suggests, to me that it was to provide positive pressure, meaning an air intake, rather than a drain of some description.
    I've seen similar on modern a/c heater air intakes (although not streamlined like this).
     
  5. R Pope

    R Pope Member

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    They have zinc chromate colour, probably USAF parts, though post-war it was everywhere. Lots of captured enemy aircraft ended up at Edwards, too.
    The link looks small, maybe off a nose wheel assembly?
     
  6. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Thanks for the inputs folks! As far as the first item - I think it's a drain from a large radial engine, but this is only a guess. I've seen smaller ones and they usually clustered with other drains. I believe the lower part is from a NLG. It did have a coating on it but it isn't zinc chromate and the part at the joint is a bumper or stop. These are definitely not foreign aircraft as the hardware on both parts are carrying standard "AN/ NAS" identification. For the lower one, anyone have any photos of early F-86 NLG?
     
  7. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I've just had a look at a load of F-86 photos Joe, and you could be right. The nose gear leg had two scissor links, one each fore and aft, as you know. The forward link appears to have the 'bumper', which is attached to, or at least linked onto, the 'split' nose wheel door. Unfortunately, I can't see if the link has the lightening perforations. The rear link has offset arms, and doesn't appear to have perforations, but again, this isn't very clear in all the pics I've looked at. I think I might have some close -up shots of my own somewhere - if I can find them! If so, I'll post what I find.
     
  8. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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  9. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Sorry Joe - just had a closer look at some pics, and I was wrong. There isn't a forward scissor link on the F-86, only the rear link, which doesn't have that extension. What I at first thought was a forward link is just an arm, connected to the folding 'split' forward doors, which presumably pulls the doors 'straight' as the leg retracts.
    The one you have does look similar to the offset link on the F-4 Phantom though, but can't say it is from an F-4.
     
  10. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    In light of since added info, I'm wondering if it's from a US Navy bird Joe, with the extra nose scissors and attachment for the steam catapult (or whatever you guys call it)?
     
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