Raids....

Discussion in 'WW2 General' started by Lucky13, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Which would you say were the most daring Commando/Special Forces raids in WWII, both Axis and Allied?
     
  2. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

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    Axis: Mussolini rescue
    Allied: St Nazaire Raid

    Honorable mention:
    assassination of Yamoto
    "COCKLESHELL HEROES"
     
  3. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    Axis: I have to agree with the Mussolini rescue.
    Allied: Raid at Cabanatuan
     
  4. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    Excellent choice.
     
  5. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    #5 Lucky13, Jun 19, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 19, 2009
    How about "Carlson's Raiders" and their well known 31 day patrol (4Nov--4Dec 1942) behind enemy lines on Guadalcanal, usually referred to as "The Long Patrol." Thought to be the longest WWII patrol of its kind, it resulted in 488 enemy killed, and 16 killed and 18 wounded for the 2d Raider Battalion.

    THAT, must have been some patrol!

    Marine Raiders on Bougainville, New Guinea, January 1944.
     

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  6. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

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  7. Bernhart

    Bernhart <b>2012 Forum Fantasy Football Champion</ b>

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    how about the fast boat guys off italian greek islands?
     
  8. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

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    Great photo!!!!

    .
     
  9. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    I'll go with Viking and several others on this one: for sheer ballsiness, Axis get the Mussolini rescue and Allies get the Cabanatuan liberation. Not to steal thunder from any of the other raids that happened during the war, but these two stand out in my mind.
     
  10. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

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    The Telemark raids on the Norwegian Heavy water plant. If you ever get the chance to see the 1948 Norwegian film Kampen om tungtvannet watch it its a brilliant film starring several of the real raiders. Much much better than the Hollywood version made years later.

    Norwegian heavy water sabotage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  11. Vassili Zaitzev

    Vassili Zaitzev Well-Known Member

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  12. parsifal

    parsifal Well-Known Member

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    #12 parsifal, Jun 23, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2009

    I agree completely. Might also include the activities of the LRDGs in the desert, 1940-43.

    Another great effort, though not exactly a "special operation" was the activities of the coastwatchers in the Solomons, in particular Martin Clements.

    On the Axis side i would nominate the activities of the 10th Flotilla....the special group that launched the "Maille" (Human Torpedoes, or SLCs ) operations, the most successful of which incapacited two British Batteships in Alexandria harbour

    http://www.transparent.com/italian/man-rides-pig-underwater-–-part-2/
     
  13. Amsel

    Amsel Active Member

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  14. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    Bruneval. St Nazaire how are these raids overlooked?
     
  15. Watanbe

    Watanbe Member

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    St Nazaire is a very dashing and daring raid and takes the cake for me.

    The difference between success and failure in these operations is such a fine line. The bravery of the men involved is really quite amazing.
     
  16. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    St. Nazaire....is that where they rammed the boat into the only Atlantic drydock capable of holding the Bismark (or one of Germany's bigger ships); commandos all were eventually captured and the Germans thought the mission a colossal failure until the timed charges in the ship went off completely demolishing the drydock gates, rendering it unusable and pretty much confining that German ship to the north where it had access to a German drydock?

    What gets me is that these men undertook these missions knowing that the odds of them surviving were so slim that they weren't worth calculating. And yet they still did the missions... :salute:
     
  17. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

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    In the second post...

    do you have me blocked Mr Lead foot?

    .
     
  18. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    nope not at all just my alzheimers won't let me have that type of recall:oops:
     
  19. Watanbe

    Watanbe Member

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    Basically yes, It was destroyed so that the Tirpitz couldn't go into repairs. It essentially confined it to the region where it stayed for the war. If the Tirpitz got out into the Atlantic and had a serviceable base it would of been disastrous for Allied convoys.

    Commando casualties were very high but the goal was achieved, The Port wasn't serviceable until 46-47, I believe only 22 Commandos actually made it out. 5 Victoria Crosses were handed out in the operation! One was recommended by the Captain of a German destroyer after a British Commando refused to leave the guns on the MTB despite being shot something like 13 times.
     
  20. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Active Member

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    Dunno how that one slipped my mind. I'll step right up and add that to my list, right there next to Cabanatuan.

    As a slightly-offtrack side-note....are there any good books on the raid?
     
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