Relative manoeuvrability of early to mid 30's aircraft

Discussion in 'Between the wars 1918-1939' started by Ascent, Apr 7, 2012.

  1. Ascent

    Ascent Member

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    I wonder if I could get a little help on a project I'm working on.

    I'm trying to sort out how manoeuvrable certain aircraft were with relation to each other. These are the aircraft:-

    I-15 Polikarpov I-15 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I-16 Polikarpov I-16 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    HE51 Heinkel He 51 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    HS123 Henschel Hs 123 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    CR32 Fiat CR.32 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    P-26 Boeing P-26 Peashooter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Gladiator Gloster Gladiator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Fury Hawker Fury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Swordfish Fairey Swordfish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I reckon at the bottom of the pile would be the Swordfish with the HS-123 above it with the HE-51 above that simply because it was designed as a fighter even though it was soon obsolete. The Fury I would place above that as I understand it was quite an acrobatic aircraft for it's time.

    Above that I'd think the P-26 then the I-16. The I-15 and the CR32 I understand were generally considered about equal during the Spanish civil war so would go in at the same point although there must be differences in how they flew. That leaves the Gladiator at the top as I understand it was considered about equal to the CR42 during WWII.

    So best to worst

    Gladiator
    I-15/CR32
    I-16
    P-26
    Fury
    HE-51
    HS123
    Swordfish

    I'll admit that my knowledge of some of these aircraft is very basic and I'm not sure were to find the information I'm after so hopefully you kind people here will be able to help me.

    Cheers,
    Ascent.
     
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