Rifles are ancient tech.

Discussion in 'Modern' started by The Basket, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. The Basket

    The Basket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,318
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I was studying the EM-2 thinking to myself that's a modern rifle and compares favourably to the M16 or AK.
    But it's from 1950!
    Seems little has changed.
    The G11 was modern but costs a lot and didn't go anywhere.
    Is there anything out there which is modern? A move away from the M16s and AKs?
    I would appreciate your input.
     
  2. parsifal

    parsifal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    10,676
    Likes Received:
    676
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Urban Design/Strategic Studies Tutor
    Location:
    Orange NSW
  3. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,336
    Likes Received:
    405
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Motor Mechanic
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Some believe that the days of the Assault Rifle are over. Soldiers should carry a small light short ranged (200m or so) weapon capable of single or automatic fire, unless they carry a Sniper Rifle, Machine Gun or Grenade launcher. All others in the squad become protectors of, look outs spotting targets for and carrying ammunition for the Sniper, MG and Grenade Launcher. Assault Rifles would be kept but would be one of a range of weapons that could be issued as and when required not the main weapon of a foot soldier, much as an Anti Tank weapon would be carried only when there is armour in the area or a bunker needs busting. The "Golf Bag" of weapons plus ammo and rations would be carried by a small robotic "Mule"

    Modern soldiers are weighed down by more kit than ever and a lot of ex soldiers are discharged with ruined knees and backs.
     
  4. The Basket

    The Basket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,318
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Something like the transition from the M16 to the M4?
    Not exactly cutting edge.
    Flechette and caseless ammunition never got nowhere and directed energy weapons are still only in Star Trek.
    Of course we can start to have interchangeability where you can change a rifle barrel or even the calibres of a rifle to suit current need.
    My view is that the Enfield P13 would still be a viable weapon today and if you can still use a 100 year old rifle and kick ass then something ain't right.
     
  5. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,336
    Likes Received:
    405
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Motor Mechanic
    Location:
    Lancashire
  6. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Consellor
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    I would argue that the EM2 is much better than the M16 or AK47 or anything else. The big advantage is that the cartridge is a good average between the 5.56 and the older rifle 7.62.

    The 5,56 has always had a question mark as to its power and the 7.62 is too much for hand held automatic fire.
     
  7. The Basket

    The Basket Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,318
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    48
    EM-2 was years ahead.
    It's cancellation was political.
    I found calibres argument to be pretty pointless. I personally don't think being shot by any cartridge to be conducive to good health.
    Interesting about the Canadian Rangers and use of a bolt action.
     
  8. gjs238

    gjs238 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2009
    Messages:
    1,710
    Likes Received:
    107
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    From the attached article:
    • The mission of the Rangers is <SNIP> support of the CAF’s sovereignty and domestic operation tasks in Canada. They act as the ‘eyes and ears’ of the CAF in remote locations
    • the most present threat is from dangerous wild animals.
     
Loading...

Share This Page