Salt technique and acrylics....

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by dneid, Dec 14, 2014.

  1. dneid

    dneid Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2012
    Messages:
    1,108
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Program/Project Mgr
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Hey, Guys,
    Well, to make my life a little more complicated, I am investigating the salt method for chipping. However, given that I am also switching over to acrylics for the 1st time (Vallejo), I have a couple of questions about the salt technique and acrylics:
    1) When removing the salt, will the water lift the paint as well? Just how well does acrylic hold up to the water when removing the salt?
    2) Just how do you get the salt to stick? I have seen a few videos on Youtube and quite a few use hairspray and salt. I would prefer to stick with just the salt at present. Trying to control the degrees of freedom in this learning curve.

    Any and all feedback is much appreciated.
     
  2. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2008
    Messages:
    25,149
    Likes Received:
    960
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Calgary
    Never tried it Dale. Check out one of Destroza's builds where he explained it all in detail. I think it was a Japanese subject.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. JKim

    JKim Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2014
    Messages:
    2,545
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Carlsbad, CA
    I used a 1/72 Hien as a test bed for both the salt and hairspray method. It's buried on page 2 of my Dora build that I did for the Winter GM...

    http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/-2...12-winter-war-eastern-front-wwii-41613-2.html

    As far as your questions..

    1. Removing the salt with water will not have an affect on acrylic paint that's been allowed to dry. This is based on my work using Tamiya, Gunze-Sangyo and Testor's acrylic paints. The dried salt crystals can have more of an adverse effect on your paint job if you try to brush it off dry.

    2. I simply sprinkled salt grains onto a section that had been pre-wet with some water. Because of gravity, you will have to work on one section at time, facing up and you'll have to wait until the water dries a bit before you can start on a section that faces a different way.

    I preferred the hairspray method. The salt method takes longer. All of the emphasis is at the beginning of the process (salt application) You have to get it right on the first shot because once the top coat has been sprayed, the salt crystals have predetermined where your chips are going to be. The hairspray method allows you to chip small areas at a time, inspecting as you go... more control because the emphasis is at the end of the process... I like that way better.

    They definitely yield different looking results... the ideal would be a combination of both techniques. I strongly recommend a test before you attempt it on a "real" build.
     
  4. destrozas

    destrozas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    55
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    electromechanical assembly
  5. ian lanc

    ian lanc Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    702
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    un-employed, i'm not bone, just injured my back at work
    Location:
    mansfield, nottinghamshire
    Me neither! Mad salt chipping only looks good on the correct aircraft! No point in mass chipping an RAF wartime bombers fighters as it was rarely seen, Jap' aircraft is only the type I've seen this on.

    Saw a Lancaster salt chipped to death, lovely model but the bad salt chip effect ruined it.
     
Loading...

Share This Page