September 1943. Allies seize Aegean ILO southern Italy.

Discussion in 'WW2 General' started by davebender, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    German strategic material reserve. As of 13 November 1943.
    (Data from “Inside the Third Reich”)
    Chromium. 5.6 month supply.
    …..Essential for production of certain types of steel.
    …..Most of the German supply came from Turkey.
    Silicon. 6.4 month supply.
    Molybdenum. 7.8 month supply.
    Nickel. 10 month supply.
    Wolfram. 10.6 month supply.
    Manganese. 19 month supply.

    Historically Britain attempted to seize the Aegean during September to November 1943 in support of a diplomatic campaign to encourage Turkey to ally with Britain. The military operation and diplomatic effort both failed.

    Point of Departure.
    The U.S. Government grasps the significance of Turkish chromium to the German war effort. Seizing the Aegean would cause catastrophic damage to German munitions production. During September 1943 the western allies will seize Crete and some of the larger Aegean Islands rather then invading southern Italy. Aircraft and naval forces established on these islands will choke off trade between Turkey and Germany.

    Allied military forces already occupy Sicily. If Germany evacuates Sardinia and Corsica as happened historically the Allies will occupy those islands also. Otherwise Sardinia and Corsica will remain under German control.

    The USA will offer to purchase chromium and other materials which Turkey previously sold to Germany. If Turkey wants to go further and ally with the USA that would be even better. However forcing Turkey into the war isn’t a major objective (except for PM Churchill). Nor is the USA interested in landing troops on the Balkan mainland. Interdiction of chromium is the sole objective of this operation. The next major U.S. amphibious landing will be in northern France.

    IMO this operation might have accomplished more for the Allied war effort then historical landings on mainland Italy and at lower cost.
     
  2. Vincenzo

    Vincenzo Active Member

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    Germans had not the strenght for maintain control of Sardinia and Corsica
     
  3. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Sardinia and Corsica did not have enough military or economic value to make them worth defending. If those islands contained something valuable such as oil, chromium or tungsten they would have been defended.
     
  4. Vincenzo

    Vincenzo Active Member

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    #4 Vincenzo, Jul 31, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
    and as you send reinforce/supply in that islands?

    in Sardina there were Manganese and Molibdeno minerals (MnO2 and MoS2)
     
  5. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Mid 1943 Germany had a 19 month reserve of Manganese.
     
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