Strange photo

Discussion in 'Aircraft Pictures' started by Marcogrifo, Jun 1, 2009.

  1. Marcogrifo

    Marcogrifo Member

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    Days ago I came across this strange photo of an early model of Heinkel 111 bomber on the site Airwar.ru:

    [​IMG]

    Can someone tells me for what reason they digged into ground wheels? :shock:

    I really can't figure out why...:rolleyes:

    Cheers
     
  2. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    The only practical reason I can think of for digging the wheels out is that it got bogged in, they waited for the ground to dry out sufficiently and then got to it
     
  3. Marcogrifo

    Marcogrifo Member

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    Yep, I see the point, it make sense, thank you Colin.
    Anyway seems a bit strange to me they had previously parked the plane into a real marsh...:lol:

    Any other?
     
  4. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    #4 Colin1, Jun 1, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2009
    I don't think they deliberately parked it in a 'marsh'.
    The onset of the Russian winter brought many problems for German mobility, mud or 'rasputitsa' severely hampered progress, resupply and affected all arms of the German offensive, roads and landing strips were quickly reduced to quagmires. Ground forces often resorted to wheeled vehicles being towed by tracked vehicles, the Luftwaffe just did the best they could.
     
  5. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Funny how that same exact problem hampered Napoleon's troops too...
     
  6. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    That's not an He-111. It looks to be an DB-3/Il-4.
     
  7. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    I think it might be am early HE111 A or B model
     
  8. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    I thought it was an early He111 too but I'm not familiar enough to positively identify it, be helpful if we could see the tail, that was unmistakeable
     
  9. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    I believe the Russian aircraft had radials
     
  10. Marcogrifo

    Marcogrifo Member

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    I think there's no doubt it's an Heinkel He111-b1 like this below:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    They're too well-dressed to be Russian ground crew :)
     
  12. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    #12 Matt308, Jun 1, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2009
    Yeah I know, but I was thinking they might have been Klimov diesels. I stand corrected.
     

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  13. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    I think Colin hit the nail on the head with the reason for the attitude of the wheels - you can see the planks lying around ready to be used for traction when they pull her out.
     
  14. HerrKaleut

    HerrKaleut Member

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    It is a 111B -1. I originally thought a b-2 but those nacelles are different
     
  15. blimp

    blimp New Member

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    hi folks , a quick i.d. check shows the lack of early wing mounted oilcoolers and larger radiators make this version a He 111 b2 .
     
  16. Vic Balshaw

    Vic Balshaw Well-Known Member

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    I tend to agree, we had a similar problem with an Islander that landed on our short runway at Talbingo, Snowy Mountains, NSW. When it turn round on the grass, it was so wet the aircraft wheels just sank into the mud.

    :hotsun: :hotsun:
     
  17. antoni

    antoni Banned

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    One possibility that comes to mind is that it is the He 111 b-2 captured during the Spanish Civil War, dismantled and shipped to the Soviet Union where it was extensively tested.
     
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