'Sturdy' rope question

Discussion in 'Building Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by hawkeye2an, Jun 5, 2010.

  1. hawkeye2an

    hawkeye2an Active Member

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    I am getting ready to build an early 1900s dirigible and it will of course need to be displayed in the air. My question is: does anybody have any ideas how to make 'rope' that will be thin enough to look to scale and sturdy enough to support the model. The model will be vacuformed with a styrene rod 'fuselage-framework'.
    Here's a pic of what I'm aiming for:
     

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  2. T Bolt

    T Bolt Well-Known Member

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    Button hole thread might work. It's a lot stronger then thread and thicker. It looks like rope and you could paint it and that would tend to stiffen it up. I don't know what scale you are working in and that would matter as to being in scale.
     
  3. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    The kind of threads you can use, depends on the model scale.
     
  4. hawkeye2an

    hawkeye2an Active Member

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    Sorry, scale WOULD be helpful. I only work in 1/48 (but how would you know that !!)
    Here's a drawing of what I had in mind. The 'ropes' would have to be stiff enough to support the model and yet thin enough to look to scale, don't know of a way to do that.
    The only other option would be to mount it to a backdrop of some kind.
    Displaying a dirigible is a little different than a airplane !!
    Excuse the drawing. I consider myself to be a bit of an artist when building and painting a model. Can't draw for sh** though.
     

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  5. magnu

    magnu Member

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    I would say two strands of twisted thin wire 1 amp fuse wire? would be the best way to get the rigidity you want, or possibly string of the appropriate scale soaked in varnish and allowed to dry.
     
  6. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Echo that. Two strands of solder twisted together and soaked in superglue works well too.
     
  7. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    #7 Wurger, Jun 7, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2010
    I agree with these two posts above.That should be enough. However I would suggested using of steelon threads. These cotton, woollen or linen ( genuine threads simply ) have a bad feature of becoming "shaggy" when soaked in varnish or a glue.
    The dust likes the feature the most.:lol:
     
  8. hawkeye2an

    hawkeye2an Active Member

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    Thanks for the tip Wurger. One thing I do to take care of the dust problem is to turn on my paint hood fan a couple of hour before painting ANYTHING, pulls most of the dust out of the room.
     
  9. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    You are welcome. :)

    Yep the dust is the major problem for all modellers. Of course the problem when painting there is. But as you mantioned, the paint hood fan can be a solution. Personally I use wet towel put near my workbench. And certainly keep the place clean .It helps with the dust too. But the trouble with the dust starts when you put the finished model on a shelf.These "shags" of the genuine threads catch the dust so easily that these become observable soon. Besides threads become grey and it doesn't depend of their colour.
     
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