Taranto under attack!

Discussion in 'Aircraft Pictures' started by pampa14, Dec 3, 2014.

  1. pampa14

    pampa14 Active Member

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    On the night of November 11, 1940, the Royal Navy launched the Operation Judgement against the Italian port of Taranto. This famous operation was the first planned attack against ships launched from aircraft carriers and was the seed aircraft to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, a year later. The following link provides a full report with photos and information about this famous military operation of WW2. I hope you enjoy it and I count on your visit.


    Aviação em Floripa: Taranto sob ataque!
     
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  2. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    Had not the way to Pearl Harbor already started in 1921 when Lloyd George sent his military assistance advisory group to Japan?
     
  3. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
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    Nice shots! Thanks for sharing.
     
  4. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    Shipachi.................. it was All because of the Brits!
     
  5. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    Rest of the world regrettably seems having very little knowledge about what happened in Asia before and after the World War 1.

    My wish is, Bill, not to blame UK but Col Sempill and his family's honour should be recovered no matter what BBC may report.

    Lloyd George tried to eliminate the US in China through Japan like they did against Russia in Manchuria. Sempill was not necessarily a genuine traitor because Churchill knew it as a member of the Lloyd George cabinet.
     
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  6. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Good series of images, but should be something like the career of the Fairey Swordfish in the early war years. Fourth from the bottom is of the Royal Navy Historic Flight's Swordfish LS326. You can also see the Ark Royal, which didn't take part in Taranto, also Swordfish from Furious judging by their markings. In the 11th picture down, there's not even a single Swordfish. Interesting ones of the Caio Duilio.

    Sadly' Shinpachi, the media has sensationalised Sempill to the extent that that is how he is remembered. What irks me the most is Frederick Rutland's reputation. He doesn't deserve his at all.
     
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  7. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    I am so glad and appreciate, nuuumannn, you always see the history very objectively.

    Fewer may know today but, as you know well, it was a worldwide common knowledge at the time that one of Japan's potential enemies was the U.S since 1872 when IJN was built and it was no problem for UK to cooperate with Japan because there were no Americans in China until the WW1 was over. Anglo-Japanese Alliance was also effective till August 1923.

    What interests me more in the BBC documentary "The Great Betrayal (Sorry if this title is not original in YouTube)", Churchill connived Sempill's connection with Japan after the treaty was expired in spite of MI5's warnings. My impression is simple - Churchill was certainly expecting something unusual would happen in the Far East. That would be a legacy of Lloyd George.
     
  8. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Shinpachi. For many years, The Far East was a place of exploitation and empire building for European nations; the USA also wanted some. Japan becoming the region's first superpower caught everyone by surprise and alliances with Britain served both countries' desires; Britain's influence in the region and to keep the USA at bay and for Japan, the opportunity to expand and grow technologically and idealistically on the world stage. The Japanese wanted the West to take them seriously.

    People these days forget that it was a very different time and expectations, political and personal were very different to how they are today. The general presses portrayal of historical events often betrays an ignorance of this and unfortunately the general public don't see fit to look a little closer than what they are told.
     
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  9. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

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    from what i understood both japan and italy got the sort end of the stick after ww1. during the negotiations afterwards the japanese delegation felt like the were being snubbed as their voice was either not heard or dismissed. the same with true with italy. so eash sought to seek their own destiny and not rely on the alligences of the past.
     
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  10. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    #10 Shinpachi, Dec 13, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
    According to a JSDF study on IJN, 1941 was the best year to make war with the Allies as less chances after 1942 and no chance after 1944 at all because of disadvantage in the military balance.
    Taranto was a great hint for IJN final decision.
     
  11. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    At the risk of being controversial, the decision to go to war with the West was the Japanese' biggest mistake they could have made. Surely it would have made more sense to have maintained an uneasy peace, and/or aligned itself with Britain and declared war against Germany in 1939. Japan's defeat in 1945 enabled countries in the Far East to seek independence from former colonial masters and to take their own path, but it did enable a greater American presence in the region and all that that entailed with the threat of communism. Japan today would be a different country if it hadn't gone to war - and without MacArthur, of course.
     
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  12. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

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    As long as I know, no Japanese historians have ever referred to the possibility of re-cooperation with UK after the alliance was over but, I don't know if it's true or not, I hear that Churchill is said commented after Japanese invasion in Singapore "Why don't they Japanese know the enjoyment of negotiation a little more? They always say Yes but suddenly attack us not saying No." This may be a myth in our side :)
     
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