Twin engined planes flying at one engine?

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by tomo pauk, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Back at the Beaufighter thread (Merlin vs. Hercules), it was mentioned the Merlin-engined variant was troublesome to fly at single engine. So I wonder what types of twin engined planes were able to decently fly (if only to home) on a single engine? IIRC Mosquito was a good performer in that discipline?
     
  2. Juha

    Juha Well-Known Member

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    But Mossie was difficult to land one engine dead. DH used its own formula when calculating the needed tail areas and their formula produced too small tails. That was the reason behind Mossies poor single engine landing characterics and the problem became really significant with DH 103 Hornet that's why they had to enlarge its fin.

    Juha
     
  3. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    P-38 flew well on one engine. If you lost an engine on takeoff you actually had to slightly power back on the good engine while configuring the aircraft for single engine operation.

    Although different twin engine aircraft will have varying single engine performance, half the battle comes from the pilot being adequately trained in multi engine operations emphasizing engine out procedures.
     
  4. Denniss

    Denniss Active Member

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    Do 335 was said to handle very well on one engine - positive side of the push-pull config.
     
  5. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    A push pull configuration is an entirely different animal when comparing to wing mounted twins. In fact you don't need an additional rating to fly a push-pull twin in the civilian world, that's how benign engine out flying characteristics are on this configuration.
     
  6. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Hi Flyboy J, I thought that was just for teh Cessna 337 Sky Disaster ... uhh ...Skymaster, and that any new push-pulls would have to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

    Am I wrong on that one?
     
  7. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Hi Greg;

    Actually I stand to be corrected, you do need a multi engine rating to fly a 337
     
  8. ShVAK

    ShVAK Member

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    In the U.S. yes. Some countries have a "centerline thrust rating" specifically for pusher-pullers like the 337, can't remember which ones offhand.
     
  9. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

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    I read somewhere that when De Havilland were showing the Mosquito off to the RAF brass they had it doing rolls and other moves on one engine, so maybe it flew OK even if it was tricky to land that way.
    FYI, I may have mentioned it before but my Grandfather was a joiner (furniture maker) and he built the wings for Mossies in a London street during WWII. He said they built one end, then the local Bobby stopped the traffic while they walked it out into the street, did a 180 and walked the other end back into the workshop. When they were done a truck came around, dropped off the materials for a new one, and took the completed one away. I guess from the way he descrind it the Mosquito had a continuous spar from wing tip to wing tip?
     
  10. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Geoffrey de Havilland certainly flew it that way on several displays. I don't think he did so on the first flight, but maybe he did in early test flights.


    Yes, the Mosquito had a single piece wing.
     
  11. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    One story I read somewhere is that a USAAF B-26 was belting along as fast as it would go, only for its crew to see a Mosquito flying along side, keeping pace. One one engine. Inverted!

    That may be complete BS though.
     
  12. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

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    It was an amazing plane, and the Hornet might have proved even amazinger!

    Good luck in the Bledisloe tonight, Wuzak. I'd like to see the ABs get their record for most consecutive test wins, then again I'd like to see the Wallabies get off the canvas too. But if that happens I'm going to post a comment conceeding that radial engines will come apart if hit by BB gun.
     
  13. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Didn't know it was on.

    Better back in the old days when they had a proper test series...
     
  14. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    It's a Championship game and a dead rubber. Doesn't stop me watching it.....6 all after 30 minutes.

    I'm sure I saw one of the Wallabies mouthing "Poofs" at the All Blacks during their Haka. Probably not a brilliant idea.

    Steve
     
  15. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

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    To Australians the world is divided into two kinds of people; Australians and poofs. I have heard that there is consideration being given to the recognition of a third, extremely small sub-catagory - Australian poofs.
     
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