V1 Buzz Bomb Aces....

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Lucky13, May 12, 2014.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    How were these counted, did they add them to pilots other tally, who was the highest scoring V1 ace, which were the preferred/safest way to bring them down?
     
  2. Aozora

    Aozora Well-Known Member

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    The highest scoring anti-V1 "ace" was Sqn. Ldr John Berry of the FIU (Fighter Interception Unit) 501 Sqn, with 59 + 1 shared (from V1 Flying Bomb Aces Andrew Thomas, pages 85-86 8 9 respectively):

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  3. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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  4. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Quite a list wasn't there...
     
  5. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    A lot of Kiwis on there as well, bearing in mind how relatively few of them there were/are :)

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  6. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Another interesting fact was that a V1 shoot down missions was not credited toward a "tour" the same as was a mission over enemy territory. I forget the ratio but it might have been that they counted for .5 missions toward a tour. Someone might correct me on that.
     
  7. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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  8. Gnomey

    Gnomey World Travelling Doctor
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    Interesting stuff guys! Be intrigued to know the difference in grading between a flight over enemy territory and a V1 shootdown mission.
     
  9. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    Bomber command certainly tried the same trick with ops over France highly unpopular with crews that had been on decimated raids over Germany. I dont really know how fighter command organised tours, I would think that flying about over southern England looking for flying bombs to blow up would be a bit of a lark.
     
  10. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    A victory over a V-1 is not counted as an aerial victory by the RAF. It is still a kill, but an official aerial victory must be over a piloted, airborne enemy aircraft that could normally be expected to be armed.

    So, a kill of something like a Bf 108, although a kill, is not an official aerial victory in the RAF of WWII.
     
  11. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    That is how I understand it but from a couple of accounts I read by pilots involved it was THE best time to be a pilot. Flying the fastest planes in existence over your home land in the summer looking for targets that dont have people in them and make a huge bang when they blow up, from what I read it doesn't get better than that. Not all pilots were obsessed with a score, saving lives with little danger to yourself is also a worthwhile persuit.
     
  12. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    It certainly was, and a kill over a V-1 wasn't exactly without risk.

    Several pilots were killed when they were too close when the 1 ton warhead went off. So V-1 hunting, while a great sport, was not "easy duty" by any means and was very necessary, at least to the people being hit by the V-1's.
     
  13. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    Sure valour and personal risk was involved, for the British pilots especially they were saving their countrymen, for the other pilots from across the globe they were saving innocent lives without any personal guilt about killing, as i read it it was the best of times a fantastic pilot, a hero but not a murderer. V1s that got through claimed a lot of lives they certainly wernt a side show.
     
  14. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Not sure I'd call a fighter pilot a murderer unless he gunned a pilot hanging in a parachute. It was war, and that was the job. Great Britain was attacked and had to defend. After D-Day, the Allies had to prosecute the war to a close or continue to lose lives and property / material in a stalemate war. It only made sense to continue until surrender.

    But I get your point and mostly agree.
     
  15. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

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    Here is a personal account of shooting at V 1s by Roland Beamont, fourth from the top in Aozora's scanned lists:

    "On the first day, speed, height, size and best methods of attack were all unknown. In the event, the attack came generally at below 2,000 feet and at speeds between 340 and 370 mph IAS; and with a three foot cross section fuselage and eight inch thick wing they proved extremely small targets to hit from the stern quarterwhich, by virtue of their high speed, was the segment in which the vast majority of fighter attacks ended up. Then there was the question of firing range and how close to go in, relative to the chances of blowing yourself up when the warhead exploded. Starting at 400 yards we experienced much wastage and frequent missing altogether until, when closing to 200 yards before firing, a higher success rate was achieved but losses were sustained due to debris and fire damage. I was convinced that the standard Fighter Command 'spread harmonisation' pattern for the guns was unsuitable for this operation and, after failing to obtain official approval, had my own guns harmonised at 300 yards. This had an immediate effect for the better on my shooting and I was able to hit the next lot of V 1s with my first burst and with good effect. Accordingly I ordered all 150 Wing guns point-harmonised in disregard of Command policy with two results: the first as immediate and sustained improvement on the Wing's scoring rate, and the second, not unexpectedly was a different sort of rocket from headquarters!"

    Just a small point, the RAF did not officially promulgate the keeping of personal tallies of enemy aircraft shot down, although it did not discourage the practise among the men since it was good for morale.
     
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  16. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    difficult to phrase correctly but I think you saw the point saving lives without hurting anyone....you could easily make a case for ignoring the V1s and just going ahead with the invasion expanding the beach head but that wasnt what it was all about.
     
  17. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    Reference: "Terror in the Starboard Seat", Dave Macintosh. Accounts of his missions in Mosquitos with 418 Squadron.
     
  18. beitou

    beitou Member

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    How common was tipping the V 1 over with a fighters wing tip? Was it a wide spread method of destroying them or a method of last resort? It seems pretty dangerous to be flying in close formation with a 1 ton bomb at 370mph.
     
  19. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Heard/read about that as well....
     
  20. herman1rg

    herman1rg Well-Known Member

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    I believe the technique was to place your own wingtip over the V1 wingtip and the air disturbance would cause it to veer off course.

    Happy to be corrected if needed.
     
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