Vickers-Supermarine logo

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by T-6, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. T-6

    T-6 Member

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    #1 T-6, Nov 20, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009
    Hi,
    Most corporations have some sort of company logo or brand. I am looking for a logo or badge for Vickers-Supermarine during wartime. I can find something for almost every other aircraft manufacturer but not them. The only thing I could find was this car club badge on eBay. Anyone out there able to help?
     

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  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    As far as I've seen so far, the design in the car club badge is more or less how the logo looked. Supermarine, as you probably know, where a separate company who became a division of the Vickers company, in order to increase Spitfire production. I haven't actually seen the logo in use on any parts or aircraft produced during WW2.
     
  3. antoni

    antoni Banned

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    In 1928 Supermarine found itself with some financial difficulties An offer was made by Vickers (aviation) Ltd to partner Supermarine in the development of high speed flight. Vickers took a major shareholding in Supermarine and consequently the company became Vickers Supermarine Ltd. of Woolston, Southampton. A bit early to be thinking of Spitfire production
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Thanks for the correction, although my reply was 'off top of the head'. I had realised the connection went back to the Schneider trophy attempts, and subsequent outright win, but hadn't realised that it was so early when the company 'officialy' became Vickers Supermarine. So, was there an official company logo?
     
  5. Waynos

    Waynos Active Member

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    #5 Waynos, Nov 24, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
    I notice that in the 1941 Jane's they advertise simply as 'Vickers-Armstrongs Limited' with no distinction between the divisions and no logo displayed either. The Advert also features prominent photos of both the Wellington and the Spitfire so the 'Supermarine' ID may have been 'submerged' at that time.

    In the company information supplied in the Aircraft section of the book it states that Vickers (Aviation) Ltd took over control of Supermarine Aviation Works Ltd in Nov 1928 and that in October 1938 Supermarine Aviation Works (Vickers)Ltd and its Parent company Vickers (Aviation) Ltd were taken over by Vickers-Armstrongs Ltd

    So you were both right :) Interestingly, it seems it neve actually was called 'Vickers-Supermarine'. At least, officially.
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Thanks Waynos, that's clarified things for me. I vaguley recall, from way back, learning that 'they' never were officially 'Vickers-Supermarine', which is probably why I always thought of them as a divison of Vickers. It was an uncle who told me that, I think around 1964, when he used to work at (the then) Vickers factory at Weybridge, and I'd also seen this in print somewhere.
     
  7. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    I'm just hypothesizing here
    round about that time, did anyone bar the big corporations really bother with logos? Or did they just emblazon the side of their works with their name? Generally speaking, I'm sure one or two used logos but you don't seem to see much widescale use of them, they seemed a bit novel at the time.

    There didn't seem to be the same marketing energy channelled into 'branding' as you'd get in today's image-conscious cartels.
     
  8. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I think you're probably right Colin. Those that were around, and eventually became a logo as we'd know it today, were more or less derivations of the way the company name was, as you stated, emblazoned on the factory gates etc. For instance, A.V.Roe's 'AVRO' device, in it's semi art noveau style, was a version of the style used on the buildings etc, as was de Havillands 'DH' with the prop.
    I had seen the design for Supermarine posted above, but I have a feeling it's something that grew possibly post war, and possibly unofficially.
     
  9. racerguy00

    racerguy00 Member

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    Speaking of logos, and I know this is kinda off the topic, but check out the logo of the one of the hockey teams that competes in my local team's league.
     

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