Wellington Propeller? - Help to Identify

Discussion in 'Basic' started by Steven, Oct 10, 2015.

  1. Steven

    Steven New Member

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    #1 Steven, Oct 10, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
    Hi, my late father was into his historic aircraft in a big way. In a corner of his garage I found this propeller blade.
    It has a label on it stating its a wellington bomber propeller blade, this wouldn't surprise me given his interest.
    I have searched the internet to try and ID the markings with no success - can anyone help me identify the blade?
    I will move the spiders out of the way and take a closer look at the boss for additional markings if that helps
    Thanks Steve
     

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  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Welcome to the site.

    It looks like the Rotol Electric wooden prop balde used for Wellingtons. How does look the another side of that?
     
  3. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    #3 Wurger, Oct 10, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
    The coloured disc denoted the type of material the blade was manufactured from. The letter (if present) in the disc denotes pre-balanced blades that can be fitted to the same hub. The lettering next to the disc was the Rotol drawing number for the blade and was usually stenciled in white.

    The colour of the disc:
    Pink - Jablo wood
    Yellow - Spruce or douglas fir
    Green - hydulignum wood
    White - Aluminium Alloy

    The first letter on the disc tells the type of covering on the blade - Rotoloid or Rotoloid thin.
    The second letter indicates the type of sheath on the leading edge
    S - simple sheath of brass or steel
    A - armoured sheath

    Rotol prop id.jpg
     
  4. Steven

    Steven New Member

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    Hi Wurger,

    Many thanks for the reply to my post.
    The reverse side has no markings and is undamaged.
    Is you can just make out there is a split in the Rotoloid? in the lower trailing edge of the blade on the marked side.
    I have added a few close up photos of this area.

    Is it possible from the markings to tell which specific aircraft if any this was fitted to?
    It would be good to trace the aircraft and have a little history.
    If not I will probably dispose of it, is there a market for a little piece of history in this condition?
    thanks steve
     

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  5. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    I understand. Thank you for these additional images. Unfortnately it is not possible to find out what a particular plane was fitted with the prop blade rather. Unless you know the member of a maintence crew who dismounted the blade from the plane or your late father found documents with the info. If he didn't, I don't think the finding can be possible.
     
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