North American B-25 Mitchell

The North American B-25 Mitchell was an American twin-engined medium bomber. It was used by many Allied air forces, in every theater of World War II, as well as many other air forces after the war ended, and saw service across four decades. The B-25 was named in honour of General Billy Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation. The B-25 is the only American military aircraft named after a specific person. By the end of its production, nearly 10,000 B-25s in numerous models had been built. These included a few limited variations, such as the United States Navy's and Marine Corps' PBJ-1 patrol bomber and the United States Army Air Forces' F-10 photo reconnaissance aircraft. The majority of B-25s in American service were used in the Pacific. It fought on Papua New Guinea, in Burma and in the island hopping campaign in the central Pacific. It was in the Pacific that the aircraft’s potential as a ground attack aircraft was discovered and developed. The B-25 also proved itself to be a very capable anti-shipping weapon, sinking many of the ships being used to reinforce the Japanese position. The RAF received nearly nine hundred Mitchells, using them to replace Douglas Bostons, Lockheed Venturas and Vickers Wellington bombers. The Mitchell entered active RAF service on 22 January 1943. At first it was used to bomb strategic targets in occupied Europe. After the D-Day invasion the RAF used its Mitchells to support the armies in Europe, moving several squadrons to forward airbases in France and Belgium. Info: Wikipedia Profiles: American Aircraft Of World War II Published by Chancellor Press Ltd. Wings Palette Fighting Aircraft of World War II Published by Salamander Books.

North American B-25 Mitchell
Roelf, May 28, 2011
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