B-29 Crash Site - Bleaklow

Discussion in 'Technical' started by Alex.UK, May 23, 2008.

  1. Alex.UK

    Alex.UK New Member

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    Hi Everyone

    What a great site this is.

    My first post and question...

    I recently visited the crash site of B29 44-61999 of the 16th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 91st Reconnaissance Group, 311th Air Division at Bleaklow.

    A lot of the wreckage remains with many sections showing serial numbers.

    However I came across a piece of wreckage with ' Boeing' stamped on it, and on the back a serial number.

    Does anybody know from which section of the aircraft it came from etc?..

    Thanks

    Alex
     

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  2. <simon>

    <simon> Member

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    G'day Alex
    Wow! Not bad for a first post!

    Could you provide a bit of scale to these pictures?
    I'm definately no expert but that centre picture strikes me as being a part of the tail plane.
    That shaft to the right may have been attached to the elavators and as for the verticle bit, maybe the spar for the horizontal stabilizers???

    I'm interested to see what others believe this is

    Cheers
    Simon
     
  3. Alex.UK

    Alex.UK New Member

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    Hi Simon

    Thanks for the reply. I was begining to think that I wouldn't get any further. I think you could be right. The only relatively intact piece of wreckage was the entire tail plane section. I came across (after hours of searching) a
    picture taken shortly after the crash by the American Army Air Force crash investigation team which I have attached. To try and give some scale to the pictures the length of the serial number is no more than 15cm. I took alot of pictures, many with my boot in the frame to give scale but alas I didn't with this piece of wreckage.

    I'm hope to get down to the Imperial War Museum at Duxford again this year, where they have a B29, which may yield some answers.

    I've also tried to find plans for the B29 airframe but haven't as yet.

    Cheers

    Alex
     

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  4. <simon>

    <simon> Member

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    Hey Alex,

    Now you've really got me thinking about this too!

    That spar has still got it's flush rivets in it and the aluminium skin is still attached so we know that part was on the outside of the aircraft.

    That spar is also of reasonable size so we could probably presume it was part of a main horizontal surface, like the wings or tailplane.
    The thing i'm wondering about is that large control rod.
    You wouldn't happen to know if the control lines were direct or ran through a seperate motor would you?
    It strikes me as being quite a large piece of metal for the pilot to heave back and forwards.
    My only other guess would be an under carraige lever, with that spar beig part of the wing.

    Also not sure about that lump of metal on the left. It doesnt look "in line" with the other components.


    Please post anything you find out!
    Very interesting topic!

    Cheers
    Simon
     
  5. Alex.UK

    Alex.UK New Member

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    As if by magic....

    One picture with UK size 10 in the frame, which I didn't think I had. It looks too small to be gear related but who am I to guess. I really would like to get hold of the technical drawings for the B29.

    There surely wouldn't be a great number of parts with 'Boeing' embosed on them, would there?? and the serial must be significant??

    Over 200 people have read this thread, surely somebody can shed some more light on it.

    Cheers

    Alex
     

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  6. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Alex: Great first post, hope someone can help [where's flyboyJ ?] I went to
    Wiki just to see where in the world Bleaklow was and came up with the following:

    "On 3 November 1948, Boeing RB-29A Superfortress 44-61999 of the 16th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 91st Reconnaissance Group, 311th Air Division, Strategic Air Command, USAF crashed at Higher Shelf Stones whilst on route from Scampton to Burtonwood. A large amount of wreckage is still visible."
    Charles
     

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  7. Alex.UK

    Alex.UK New Member

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    Hi Charles

    Unfortunately Bleaklow has a history of crashes because of it's location and weather pattern. Lancaster, Wellington and Spitfire crash sites are all close by. The B29 has by far the greatest amount of debris remaining. What really stood out for me being at the crash site was the condition of many of the aluminium sections which looked as good as the day they were made and just how close the crew came to clearing the ridge line. Very sad indeed.

    If you want to know exactly where Bleaklow is in the Uk. Just input these co'ords in to Google Earth 53°27'1.93"N 1°51'53.40"W

    Cheers

    Alex
     
  8. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Alex: I'm at work and our company has a program [Websense] that prohibits
    us from going to a lot of sites. So I can't check out googe earth.. I will
    when I get home.

    Charles
     
  9. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Hi folks - sorry I'm a bit late. That part looks like an elevator or aileron hinge assy. It is probably a forging and it was very common to have the manufacturer to emboss their name on the part. Additionally you may see several part numbers on an item like this - one for the raw forging and one for the final part number.

    Great pic and info. You don't find too many crash sites like this one where identifiable wreckage is everywhere!
     
  10. ccheese

    ccheese Member In Perpetuity
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    Thanks, Joe. I knew you'd be around sooner or later..

    Charles
     
  11. <simon>

    <simon> Member

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    Hey again Alex,
    About your question regarding how many parts would have Boeing stamped on them, I have a Mosquito tailwheel unit which has 'De Havilland' and serial numbers literally all over it!!
    I filled 2 pages just copying all the codes/serials i could find.
    I assume the Yanks go by the same system.

    Hey ccheese, in that photo of yours, are all the cylinders of those engines missing their cylinder heads??
    Great pic btw
     
  12. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    We might.

    For the most part a forging or casting will have the manufacturer's name on it, not only to identify who made it but it also signifies who owns the forging or casting tools. These could be very expensive to make and manufacturers usually keep close reins on them (at least the guys I worked for). On the part you'll find the basic part number, casting or forging number, a heat treat lot number and inspection stamps which also provide a bunch of information depending if the part was rejected and later re-worked.
     
  13. Rusker

    Rusker Member

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