ENGINE BOOSTS

Discussion in 'Engines' started by FLYBOYJ, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    From GregP, good info - Thanks Greg!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. altsym

    altsym Member

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    Awesome, thanks!
     
  3. Ivan1GFP

    Ivan1GFP Member

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  4. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Hi Guys,

    What I sent was an Excel file and the numbers are purely for test purposes. If you start in the first row and insert some value for "Bar" and then go across and enter the first-row value for the rest into the coral border entry area, they all get identical numbers.


    For instance, if you put 9.812 Bar into cwll E7, you get (across), 98.124 kPa, 1.01 ata, 0.736 mm Hg, 28.979 in Hg, 10,005 mm H2O, and 14.232 psi boost. If you, in turn, enter those numbers into the coral border cell in the rest of the rows, then all rows match.

    Mostly I use the second area anyway since I only came across mm water one time in references. It is sort of unneeded.

    Hopefully the Excel file can be posted somehow so you can use it interactively.

    If not, send me a PM and I could email it to you.

    Best regards, - Greg
     
  5. Ivan1GFP

    Ivan1GFP Member

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    Thanks for the quick response GregP,

    Please do send me a copy of the spreadsheet. My email address is [email protected]
    I did a similar spreadsheet a few years back (screenshot in linked thread) and can send that to you also if you send your email address.

    BTW, Are Russian boost settings the same as Japanese? I thought they used absolute pressure instead of pressure above STP.

    Thanks.
    - Ivan.
     
  6. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Tried to upload the excel sheet, no joy :(
     
  7. Ivan1GFP

    Ivan1GFP Member

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  8. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Hey Ivan ... sent.

    FlyboyJ, thanks for trying!

    Best regards, - Greg
     
  9. JtD

    JtD Member

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    1.00 ata = 0.98 bar = 98 kPa = 736 mm Hg = 29.0 in Hg = 10000 mm H2O = 14.2 psi

    There are a couple of errors in the tables.
     
  10. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Yes, there are a couple of errors.

    On the top line:

    1 bar = 100kPa
    0.987 atmospheres
    750.188 mmHg
    29.535 inHg
     
  11. JtD

    JtD Member

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    Please do not mistake at with atm. One is the technical atmosphere, 1 at = 0.981 bar, one is the physical atmosphere, 1 atm = 1.013 bar. The boost given for German engines of the time is usually given in technical atmospheres absolute, ata. Pressure given for German tires of the time is usually given in technical atmosphere relative (excess pressure, Überdruck), atü. Only physicists would use atm.
     
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