Go 145 - how many?

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Burunduk, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Burunduk

    Burunduk New Member

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    Dear friends,

    some sources insists that about 10 000 Go.145 were built in Germany. It seems too much, because from 1939 to 1945 only 11546 school aircraft were built at all.

    Other authors speak about 1182 Go.145.

    Couldn't you clearify this? And how many Go.145 were built in Turkey and in Spain (CASA 1145)?

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Aaron Brooks Wolters

    Aaron Brooks Wolters Well-Known Member

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    Burunduk, here is what I found after a short search. I don't know if you have already been to this site or not. Here is the link though, Gotha Go 145 Trainer I hope this helps. I don't know much of anything about this aircraft so someone else here may be of more help.
     
  3. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Burunduk, from the sources I've checked, there were 1,182 Go145 (all varients) produced in Germany by Gotha, Ago, Focke-Wulf and BFW. That number doesn't include the prototype aircraft constructed before it went into production.

    As far as the Spanish (CASA 1145-L) and Turkish lisence built aircraft, I think that's where you're getting the 10,000 figure, since they were produced and used long after WWII came to a close and that number would be seperate from the German built aircraft.

    One good resource is the book titled "German aircraft of the Second World War: including helicopters and missiles" (by Antony L. Kay, John Richard Smith, Eddie J. Creek).
     
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