Help with ANT-18 cockpit panel identification

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numavirte

Recruit
6
2
Mar 5, 2022
Viterbo
Hi, I'm trying to identify the cockpit of this Link Trainer ANT-18, present at the Aviation Museum of the Italian Army. Any help identifying this panel would be greatly appreciated, thanks.
 

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IMHO it is not of any particular plane cockpit. The Link Trainer ANT-18 was equipped with a full suite of standard flight and navigation indicators used for most planes at that time. Its main role wasn't to "pretend" any particular plane type cockpit but teaching pilots of the distribution of attention to instruments on the panel and their indications during a flight without visibility. So just a safe way to teach new pilots how to fly by instruments , no matter what aircraft could be flown in reality.
 
IMHO it is not of any particular plane cockpit. The Link Trainer ANT-18 was equipped with a full suite of standard flight and navigation indicators used for most planes at that time. Its main role wasn't to "pretend" any particular plane type cockpit but teaching pilots of the distribution of attention to instruments on the panel and their indications during a flight without visibility. So just a safe way to teach new pilots how to fly by instruments , no matter what aircraft could be flown in reality.

Thanks for the reply. Here in Italy (in the Army Aviation) the first aircraft used was the Piper L18C. I thought that the cockpit of the L18C or that of its successor L19 was simulated on this Link Trainer.
None of the panels in the "Illustrated Parts Catalog" dated 1/6/1943 are like this in the picture. I was convinced there was a default cockpit model for each aircraft.
 
I see . The Link Trainers were sold in a period ranging from 1934 through to the late 1950s. The ANT-18 - (Army Navy Trainer model 18) was in its turn, a slightly enhanced version of Link's C3 model. It was also produced in Canada for both the RCAF and the RAF with a somewhat modified instrument panel, where its model designation was D2.
 
I see . The Link Trainers were sold in a period ranging from 1934 through to the late 1950s. The ANT-18 - (Army Navy Trainer model 18) was in its turn, a slightly enhanced version of Link's C3 model. It was also produced in Canada for both the RCAF and the RAF with a somewhat modified instrument panel, where its model designation was D2.
thanks
 

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