Ranges of WWII Prop and Jet aircraft

Discussion in 'Technical' started by Hairog, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. Hairog

    Hairog Member

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    I spent a couple of hours googling and can't get a list of the combat ranges of WWII prop and jet aircraft. I'm sure it's out there. Can anyone show me the way to enlightenment?
     
  2. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    Good luck.

    It is hard to get good range figures on even one type of airplane.

    Range changed with both cruising speed used and altitude flown at even for the same plane with the same fuel capacity and that is before you start adding things like external bombs or rockets or even certain radar installations.
     
  3. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    You can find a good general figure by just looking up the specifications for the aircraft type. But as shortround6 has already pointed out that varies with altitude, speed, payload, etc.
     
  4. Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky Active Member

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    What type of range figures do you want?

    Still air cruising, ferry range or combat radius? All three are quire different.

    Range depends markedly on speed and altitude flown.

    The problem also exists in that even in the same aircraft type, there were many different ranges, due to differing configurations and internal fuel carried.

    Supermarine Spitfires had best cruising speed ranges on internal fuel of between 430 and 840 miles. Even individual sub-types had differences: some Mk IXs had 85 Imp gal internal fuel, while others had 94 imp gal (or about 10% more fuel). Vary late war Mk IXs were also fitted with a 45 imp gal rear fuel tank.

    Same can be said for the Tempest V. There was an optional front nose tank, 20 Imp gal IIRC, which added about 15% to range.
     
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