Spay-on protective coating

bauple58

Recruit
9
3
Apr 20, 2018
Hoping someone can remind me the name of the spay-on protective sealant (seen in this Library of Congress image Control Number 2017691334), that was applied to Lend-Lease aircraft delivered by sea? Thanks

service-pnp-fsa-8b02000-8b02400-8b02491v.jpg
 

AL90

Airman
17
31
Nov 26, 2022

There.
During the first part of the war deck-loaded planes were covered with cosmoline, a heavy petroleum or grease, but its effectiveness was limited. With the initiation of large-scale shipment by tankers in 1943, there was a need for a more satisfactory anticorrosive, and paralketone was developed. This heavy petroleum derivative proved moderately successful, especially in cool and cold weather and was therefore especially useful in the Atlantic. Its chief deficiency was the difficulty encountered in removing it. Continued experimentation led to development of a plastic coating* which was first used in November 1943. Adopted for standard use in 1944, it remained the chief means of protecting deck-loaded planes from the elements for the remainder of the war. The chief advantage of the plastic coating was that it required only 3 to 4 man-hours to peel off, compared with 200 man-hours to remove paralketone. In spite of its decreased effectiveness as a protective device during winter weather, the plastic coating was used on more than 10,000 of the 14,000 processed aircraft shipped overseas during 1944.54


Processing and deck-loading aircraft was also more economical than crating them, according to a study made in March 1944. The cost of transporting and delivering the processed plane was only $890, compared with $1,357 for the crated plane. The processed plane also




* These plastics had a variety of trade names, including Eronol and Plastiphane.
 

kalani

Airman
40
19
Nov 16, 2020
Hoping someone can remind me the name of the spay-on protective sealant (seen in this Library of Congress image Control Number 2017691334), that was applied to Lend-Lease aircraft delivered by sea? Thanks

View attachment 700425
We used years ago a product called "SprayLat." Not sure if the same. There is also a acetate now plastic sheet covering that is shrink wrapped on with heat.
 

AL90

Airman
17
31
Nov 26, 2022
We used years ago a product called "SprayLat." Not sure if the same. There is also a acetate now plastic sheet covering that is shrink wrapped on with heat.
I remember that "Spraylat" was used at Davis Monthan for mothballing, not sure if it is still used or in a different form. Shrinkwarp is used a lot for mothballing yachts and power boats using a heat gun.
 

bauple58

Recruit
9
3
Apr 20, 2018
During the first part of the war deck-loaded planes were covered with cosmoline, a heavy petroleum or grease, but its effectiveness was limited. With the initiation of large-scale shipment by tankers in 1943, there was a need for a more satisfactory anticorrosive, and paralketone was developed. This heavy petroleum derivative proved moderately successful, especially in cool and cold weather and was therefore especially useful in the Atlantic. Its chief deficiency was the difficulty encountered in removing it. Continued experimentation led to development of a plastic coating* which was first used in November 1943. Adopted for standard use in 1944, it remained the chief means of protecting deck-loaded planes from the elements for the remainder of the war. The chief advantage of the plastic coating was that it required only 3 to 4 man-hours to peel off, compared with 200 man-hours to remove paralketone. In spite of its decreased effectiveness as a protective device during winter weather, the plastic coating was used on more than 10,000 of the 14,000 processed aircraft shipped overseas during 1944.54


Processing and deck-loading aircraft was also more economical than crating them, according to a study made in March 1944. The cost of transporting and delivering the processed plane was only $890, compared with $1,357 for the crated plane. The processed plane also




* These plastics had a variety of trade names, including Eronol and Plastiphane.
Got to love this forum. Thanks to all, and particularly Snautzer01 both or pointing me in the right direction and, including his source citation.
 

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