U.S. Army and Navy planes telescopic gunsights

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Maxrobot1, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. Maxrobot1

    Maxrobot1 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    A very prominent feature of U.S. military aviation of the late '30' and early '40s was the long tube-like telescopic gun sights that P-26s, F4Bs, TBDs and more had sticking out of the front of the windshield.
    Was their view limited? Was there any compensation involved for the aircraft's movements? was there a different type for each plane?
     
  2. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,811
    Likes Received:
    181
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    i always thought that site was used for bombs or torpedos....
     
  3. Jenisch

    Jenisch Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1,048
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Not US prominent. Tendency of the time.
     
  4. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Some japanese aircraft used telescopics as well, including early KI-43 Oscars. The sights must have had some prety significant drawbacks because they were always a footnote to reflector sights and plain iron sights, both of which with they co-existed
     
  5. Jenisch

    Jenisch Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1,048
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    #5 Jenisch, Feb 25, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
    A telescopic sight was used in the A5M and the Ki-27. While the I-15, I-16 and I-153 also used telescopic sights.
     
  6. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I did a little reading on this. Were these sights we have been talking about telescopic, or were they Aldis Sights? If the latter, there was little or no magnification. The main advantage of the sight was that the pilot did not have to align his eye with the sighting point, as with iron sights. Rather, he could view the image on his end of the sight much like a display, rather than having to put his eye to an eyepiece, as with a telescope. Does this make sense?
     
  7. Jenisch

    Jenisch Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1,048
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I think they were Aldis sights...
     
  8. CobberKane

    CobberKane Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here is a good explanation of the kind of sight we are talking about and how it was used

    Collimator sight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    it would seem that asisde from superficial resemblense there was little in common between an Aldis sight and a telescopic sight. In practice it would seem to be much more like the more compact reflector sight that replaced it. In short, you look THROUGH a telescopic sight, but you look AT an Aldis/colimator sight, just as you would a reflector sight.
     
Loading...

Share This Page